News & Updates

Meet "Hedgehog": Your tour guide to asteroids, comets and other things that whirl around the solar system

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

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A group of scholars look to early 20th century radio technology to help improve Internet security

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

A new study shows how harnessing the quantum properties of light can create a transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping.

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Professor Jeffrey Koseff to receive Stanford's 2015 Richard W. Lyman Award

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Koseff, a professor of civil and environmental engineering, and founding co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, will be honored at a Jan. 20 award dinner.

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Fei-Fei Li: How do we teach computers to understand the visual world?

Thursday, January 14, 2016

A computer scientist explores ‘the dark matter of our digital universe.’

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New Stanford battery shuts down at high temperatures and restarts when it cools

Monday, January 11, 2016

Stanford researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that turns on and off depending on the temperature. The new technology could prevent battery fires that have plagued laptops, hoverboards and other electronic devices.

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What does the great engineering school of the future look like?

Friday, January 8, 2016

Stanford School of Engineering charts a vision for the future across three critical areas: research, education and culture.

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Oleg D. Sherby, professor of materials science and engineering, dies at 90

Friday, January 8, 2016

Hailed for the discovery of superplastic steel, Sherby was a professor at Stanford for 30 years. He was known on campus for his affable manner and for organizing volleyball matches and poker games.

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New microscopy technique maps mechanical properties of living cells

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Researchers have developed a new way to use atomic force microscopy to rapidly measure the mechanical properties of cells at the nanometer scale, an advance that could pave the way for better understanding immune disorders and cancer.

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Stanford researchers develop microscope that allows first-ever look at live muscle units in action

Thursday, December 17, 2015

The basic process of force-generation in muscle has been known for decades, but until now no one has ever seen it work at a microscopic level in a living human. The new microscope could provide unique insights into treating muscular degenerative diseases.

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Stunning diversity of gut bacteria uncovered by new approach to gene sequencing devised at Stanford

Monday, December 14, 2015

A new technique can reveal subtle differences among the genomes of multiple species and subspecies of microbes.

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Stanford team develops software to predict and prevent drone collisions

Friday, December 11, 2015

How do we prevent collisions when thousands of drones are flying in congested areas? A software-enabled system could play the role of an autonomous air traffic manager for unmanned flights.

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Stanford-led skyscraper-style chip design could boost electronic performance by factor of a thousand

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

In modern computer systems, processor and memory chips are laid out like single-story structures in a suburb. But suburban layouts waste time and energy. A new skyscraper-like design, based on materials more advanced than silicon, provides the next computing platform.

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New Stanford research reveals the secrets of stishovites, a rare form of crystallized sand

Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Lasers are nothing like meteor strikes, but in the nanosecond when each strike silicon dioxide, the main ingredient in coastal sand, stishovites form. Understanding how this rare crystal form will help improve laser technology and allow Earth scientists to better understand meteor impacts.

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Stanford engineers invent process to accelerate protein evolution

Monday, December 7, 2015

A new tool enables researchers to test millions of mutated proteins in a matter of hours or days, speeding the search for new medicines, industrial enzymes and biosensors.

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Electrical Engineering Chair Abbas El Gamal receives 2016 IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal

Thursday, December 3, 2015

El Gamal is noted for contributions to network multi-user information theory and for impact on programmable circuit architectures

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Stanford engineers among recipients of Precourt Institute and TomKat Center $2.1 million grants

Thursday, December 3, 2015

Grants will fund groundbreaking energy research

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Stanford engineers develop 'invisible wires' that could improve solar cell efficiency

Thursday, December 3, 2015

Stanford engineers have discovered how to make the electrical wiring on top of solar cells nearly invisible to incoming light. The new design, which uses silicon nanopillars to hide the wires, could dramatically boost solar-cell efficiency.

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Plasma experiments bring astrophysics down to Earth

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

New laboratory technique allows researchers to replicate on a tiny scale the swirling clouds of ionized gases that power the sun, to further our understanding of fusion energy, solar flares and other cosmic phenomena.

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Stanford researcher suggests storing solar energy underground for a cloudy day

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

A common criticism of a total transition to wind, water and solar power is that the U.S. electrical grid can't affordably store enough standby electricity to keep the system stable. Stanford researcher Mark Z. Jacobson proposes an underground solution to that problem.

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Atom-sized craters make a catalyst much more active

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

SLAC, Stanford Engineering discovery could speed important chemical reactions, such as making hydrogen fuel

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Stanford students put computer science skills to social good

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Four undergraduates have co-founded CS+Social Good, an organization that utilizes technology to make a positive social impact.

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Stanford designs underwater solar cells that turn captured greenhouse gases into fuel

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Taking a cue from plants, researchers figure out how to use the sun's energy to combine CO2 with H2O to create benign chemical products, as part of a futuristic technology called artificial photosynthesis.

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Tough enough: Stanford and IBM test the limits of toughness in nanocomposites

Monday, November 16, 2015

By slipping springy polystyrene molecules between layers of tough yet brittle composites, researchers made materials stronger and more flexible, in the process demonstrating the theoretical limits of how far this toughening technique could go.

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Needed: More women in data science

Thursday, November 12, 2015

A recent gathering at Stanford on the emerging science of big data turned the usual gender ratio of science conferences on its head.

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New 'tricorder' technology might be able to 'hear' tumors growing

Monday, November 9, 2015

A new technology has promise to safely find buried plastic explosives and maybe even spot fast-growing tumors. The technique involves the clever interplay of microwaves and ultrasound to develop a detector like the Star Trek tricorder.

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