Aeronautics and Astronautics

Meet "Hedgehog": Your tour guide to asteroids, comets and other things that whirl around the solar system

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Type: 
Research News

A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

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Robotic space hedgehog will hop, flip and spin to explore asteroids.
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A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

Your best guess is that the landscape is as inhospitable as it gets: an irregular range of sharp boulders and loose rubble piles strewn among jagged crevasses and deep troughs of dust. But then again, it’s just a guess because no one’s ever actually seen this landscape up close. Now imagine that you need to send a robot across that landscape, from a perch at the lip of a steep crater to the edge of an ice-encrusted hole 1,000 meters away. And imagine that gravity is a tiny fraction of what we have on Earth.

Last modified Fri, 5 Feb, 2016 at 9:51

Stanford team develops software to predict and prevent drone collisions

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Research News

How do we prevent collisions when thousands of drones are flying in congested areas? A software-enabled system could play the role of an autonomous air traffic manager for unmanned flights.

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Software could predict and prevent drone collisions
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Software-enabled system could predict and prevent drone collisions

Stanford engineers are developing software to predict and prevent collisions of unmanned aircraft, including delivery drones, in congested urban airspace.

When Jeff Bezos unveiled his vision of drones delivering packages to Amazon customers during a 60 Minutes segment in late 2013, it caught many people as science fiction. Scarcely two years later, drones are poised to become a technology for not just delivering packages, but monitoring agriculture, gathering news in urban environments and even conducting search and rescue missions.

Last modified Fri, 11 Dec, 2015 at 13:39

Plasma experiments bring astrophysics down to Earth

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Research Profile

New laboratory technique allows researchers to replicate on a tiny scale the swirling clouds of ionized gases that power the sun, to further our understanding of fusion energy, solar flares and other cosmic phenomena.

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Experiments bring astrophysics down to Earth
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Plasma research furthers our understanding of fusion energy, solar flares

Intense heat, like that found in the sun, can strip gas atoms of their electrons, creating a swirling mass of positively and negatively charged ions known as a plasma.

For several decades, laboratory researchers sought to replicate plasma conditions similar to those found in the sun in order to help them understand the basic physics of ionized matter and, ultimately, harness and control fusion energy on Earth or use it as a means of space propulsion.

Last modified Thu, 3 Dec, 2015 at 9:23

Cosmic Clue: The Dark Matter Mystery

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Tuesday, Nov.17, 2015 at 7:30 PM
Panofsky Auditorium
Science and User Support Building (BLDG 53)

 

Date/Time: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2015. 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Location: 
SLAC, Panofsky Auditorium

Last modified Mon, 2 Nov, 2015 at 13:22

Seeing Like a Rover: the Mars Exploration Rover mission

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CS547 Human-Computer Interaction Seminars  (Seminar on People, Computers, and Design)

Fridays 12:30-2:20 pm

Gates Building, Rm B01

Open to the public

Date/Time: 
Friday, October 30, 2015. 12:30 pm - 2:20 pm
Location: 
Gates, B02
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Tue, 27 Oct, 2015 at 13:57

Antony Jameson joins Orville Wright and other aerial pioneers by winning Guggenheim Medal

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Research News

Professor of aeronautics and astronautics earns the field’s highest honor for developing the algorithms that designers use to optimize aerodynamic performance; it is Jameson’s third major honor in what has been an extraordinary year for this Stanford aeronautics expert.

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Jameson Wins Guggenheim Medal
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Professor of aeronautics and astronautics earns the field’s highest honor for developing algorithms to aid aerodynamic performance.

Antony Jameson, professor of aeronautics and astronautics, has won the Daniel Guggenheim Medal, which is considered one of the highest honors presented for a lifetime of achievement in aeronautics. Past recipients have worked in industry, government and academia, and have included Orville Wright, Charles Lindbergh, William Boeing and William Durand.

Last modified Thu, 30 Jul, 2015 at 8:57

Four engineering faculty members' projects receive grants to tackle major environmental challenges

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Research News

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment jump-starts interdisciplinary projects around the world.

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Environmental Seed Grants
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Four engineering faculty members receive Woods Institute grants to tackle environmental challenges.

How can drones help improve water quality in the San Francisco Bay? What does it take to protect marine habitats from seafloor dredging? Can a private-market approach solve household water contamination in low-income urban areas?

Last modified Thu, 9 Jul, 2015 at 14:31

Stanford Engineering Hero Charles Simonyi talks about creating first WYSIWYG software, space travel and challenges of making a profit

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Research News

Computer Science alum shares stories about working with Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, and his two flights to the International Space Station.

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Engineering Hero Charles Simonyi
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Developer of first WYSIWYG software talks about the early days of computing and traveling to space.

Modern word processing software makes it easy to design and print attractive documents. But it wasn't always so, and much of the credit for this convenience goes to pioneering computer scientist Charles Simonyi, who was recently honored as a Stanford Engineering Hero.

Since 2010 the Heroes program has recognized Stanford engineers who have profoundly advanced human, social and economic progress through engineering.

Last modified Thu, 25 Jun, 2015 at 10:37

Stanford engineers team up with U.S. Army to set computational record

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Type: 
Research News

Now billions of questions can be answered in about three minutes.

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Stanford Engineers' Computational Record
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Stanford team, U.S. Army solve billions of mathematical equations in a few minutes.

Stanford engineers have partnered with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) to set a computational record. Stanford Professor Charbel Farhat and his research team at the Army High Performance Computing Research Center (AHPCRC) used a new, high-end, massively parallel computer to demonstrate the power of algorithms that instruct processors to work together to solve challenging problems.

Last modified Wed, 10 Jun, 2015 at 10:10