Bioengineering

​Stanford-NIST collaboration aims to give the bio-economy a big boost by measuring tiny things

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​The Joint Initiative for Metrology in Biology will bring together academic, government and industrial scientists to improve the measurement techniques, or metrology, of molecular products and processes.

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​Stanford-NIST collaboration aims to give the bio-economy a big boost by measuring tiny things
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​The Joint Initiative for Metrology in Biology will bring together academic, government and industrial scientists to improve the measurement techniques, or metrology, of molecular products and processes.

A collaboration to spur the 21st Century bioeconomy | By Tricia Seibold

     

​On this day in 1875, representatives from 17 nations signed the Meter Convention, establishing a global process for setting the uniform measures that help lay the foundation for commerce, industry and science advances in the 20th century.

Last modified Fri, 20 May, 2016 at 14:07

Rethinking one of medicine’s trusty staples: the urinary dipstick

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A low-cost, portable system that uses this trusty test strip could let patients get accurate urinalysis results at home, potentially easing the workload of primary care physicians.

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Rethinking one of medicine’s trusty staples: the urinary dipstick
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A low-cost, portable system that uses this trusty test strip could let patients get accurate urinalysis results at home, potentially easing the workload of primary care physicians.

Simple and powerful, but imperfect | iStock/Eshma

      

There’s a good reason your doctor asks for a urine sample at your annual checkup. A simple, color-changing paper test, dipped into the specimen, can measure levels of glucose, blood, protein and other chemicals, which in turn can indicate evidence of kidney disease, diabetes, urinary tract infections and even signs of bladder cancer.

Last modified Tue, 17 May, 2016 at 14:56

David Camarillo: There is hope for concussion prevention

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Research Profile

​Armed with new insights on traumatic brain injuries, a Stanford bioengineer advocates rethinking the designs and standards of protective gear.

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David Camarillo: There is hope for concussion prevention
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​Armed with new insights on traumatic brain injuries, a Stanford bioengineer advocates rethinking the designs and standards of protective gear.

Bike riding is the leading cause of concussions in kids. | REUTERS/Vivek Prakash

   

For David Camarillo, concussions are a personal matter.

Last modified Wed, 11 May, 2016 at 14:15

​Innovations in medical imaging are reshaping the war against cancer

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​A biologist discusses an advanced imaging technique that can help detect early-stage tumors and guide surgeons with precision.

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​Innovations in medical imaging are reshaping the war against cancer
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​A biologist discusses an advanced imaging technique that can help detect early-stage tumors and guide surgeons with precision.

Minuscule gold nanoparticles glom onto and help identify tumor cells. | Photo by Yonatan Winetraub/Stanford School of Medicine

Last modified Fri, 13 May, 2016 at 7:53

Studying a 'Silly Putty' protein could spur efforts to repair damaged human tissues

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New insights into collagen, the stretchy protein that provides a stiff cushion for cells, aids our understanding of regenerative medicine.

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Studying a 'Silly Putty' protein could spur efforts to repair damaged human tissues
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New insights into collagen, the stretchy protein that provides a stiff cushion for cells, aids our understanding of regenerative medicine.


Stanford researchers are studying the way collagen moves between stiff and elastic states in the human body. | Image by Sebastian Kaulitzki/Shutterstock

Last modified Wed, 4 May, 2016 at 10:35

​What is the relationship between communicable illnesses and illicit drug use?

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​A scholar applies the mathematical tools of management science to help improve human health.

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​What is the relationship between communicable illnesses and illicit drug use?
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​A scholar applies the mathematical tools of management science to help improve human health.

Is methadone a cost-effective strategy for treating heroin addiction? | REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Last modified Wed, 27 Apr, 2016 at 14:33

A one-of-a-kind wind tunnel for birds paves the way for better drones

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An engineer explores how the magic of bird flight can be applied to building better aerial robots.

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A one-of-a-kind wind tunnel for birds paves the way for better drones
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An engineer explores how the magic of bird flight can be applied to building better aerial robots.

Ferrari, a lovebird, with Stanford's David Lentink, who is using a wind tunnel to probe the mysteries of birds in flight. | Photo by L.A. Cicero

Last modified Fri, 22 Apr, 2016 at 15:46

​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin

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A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

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​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin
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A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

Can we build better prostheses? | REUTERS/Mary Schwalm

Last modified Fri, 22 Apr, 2016 at 13:57

How effective data visualizations let users have a conversation with data

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Stanford’s Maneesh Agrawala and Dave Deriso share trends and tools for communicating complex quantitative information visually.

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How effective data visualizations let users have a conversation with data
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Stanford’s Maneesh Agrawala and Dave Deriso share trends and tools for communicating complex quantitative information visually.

A JavaScript web graphics library called Three.js powers a sophisticated MRI image of a brain in 3D | Image courtesy of Gallant Neuroscience Lab at UC Berkeley.

Last modified Thu, 21 Apr, 2016 at 13:12

A super stretchy, self-healing material could lead to artificial muscle

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​Researchers create a polymer that can stretch to 100 times its original length — and even repair itself if punctured.

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Self-healing material could lead to artificial muscle
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​Researchers create polymer that can stretch to 100 times its original length

In this sample of “artificial muscle,” a circle marks the spot where, after the material was deliberately punctured in an experiment, its chemical nature allowed it to heal itself. | Photo courtesy of Bao Research Group

Last modified Mon, 25 Apr, 2016 at 8:38