Bioengineering

Drew Endy discusses what bioengineers should be vibrating about

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Research News

At TEDx Stanford, the associate professor of bioengineering talks about where genetic engineering should be going.

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Good Vibrations
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Associate Professor Drew Endy discusses what bioengineers should be buzzing about.

 

In a talk at TEDx Stanford, Drew Endy, associate professor of bioengineering talks about the potential of bioengineering and the challenge of deciding how to use it.

Last modified Thu, 26 Jun, 2014 at 13:20

Stanford bioengineers make it easier to see inner workings of the brain

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Bio-X scientists have improved on their original technique for peering into the intact brain, making it more reliable and safer. The results could help scientists unravel the inner connections of how thoughts, memories or diseases arise.

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Seeing Inside the Brain
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Stanford bioengineers make it easier to see inner workings of the brain.

Last year Karl Deisseroth, a Stanford professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, announced a new way of peering into a brain – removed from the body – that provided spectacular fly-through views of its inner connections. Since then laboratories around the world have begun using the technique, called CLARITY, with some success, to better understand the brain's wiring.

Last modified Fri, 20 Jun, 2014 at 17:07

Stanford bioengineers invent a way to speed up drug discovery

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Research News

New technique can be used in living cells to track a key family of proteins that regulate health or cause disease.

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Technique Can Speed Drug Discovery
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New method can be used in living cells to track a key family of proteins that regulate health or cause disease.

Think of the human body as an intricate machine whose working parts are proteins: molecules that change shape to enable our organs and tissues to perform tasks such as breathing, eating or thinking.

Of the millions of proteins, 500 in the kinase family are particularly important to drug discovery. Kinases are messengers: They deliver signals that regulate and orchestrate the actions of other proteins. Proper kinase activity maintains health. Irregular activity is linked to cancer and other diseases. For this reason many drugs seek either to boost or suppress kinase activity.

Last modified Thu, 19 Jun, 2014 at 14:23

New Stanford blood test identifies heart-transplant rejection earlier than biopsy can

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Noninvasive test detects donor DNA in a recipient's blood when a transplanted heart is being rejected.

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New Test for Heart-Transplant Rejection
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Stanford team's blood test detects donor DNA in a recipient's blood.

Stanford University researchers have devised a noninvasive way to detect heart-transplant rejection weeks or months earlier than previously possible. The test, which relies on the detection of increasing amounts of the donor’s DNA in the blood of the recipient, does not require the removal of any heart tissue.

Last modified Wed, 18 Jun, 2014 at 11:09

Stanford scientists tie social behavior to activity in specific brain circuit in mice

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Research News

The new findings could throw light on psychiatric disorders marked by impaired social interaction such as autism, social anxiety, schizophrenia and depression.

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Social Behavior and Brain Circuits
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Stanford scientists tie social impulses to activity in a specific brain circuit.

A team of Stanford University investigators has linked a particular brain circuit to mammals’ tendency to interact socially. Stimulating this circuit – one among millions in the brain – instantly increases a mouse’s appetite for getting to know a strange mouse, while inhibiting it shuts down its drive to socialize with the stranger.

Last modified Thu, 19 Jun, 2014 at 14:24

Bioengineering and chemical engineering building at Stanford named for gifts from Ram and Vijay Shriram

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$61 million in support from university trustee and his wife names the Shriram Center for Bioengineering & Chemical Engineering and endows the departmental chair.

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Introducing the Shriram Center
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Bioengineering and chemical engineering building at Stanford named for gifts from Ram and Vijay Shriram

Stanford University will name a new home for bioengineering and chemical engineering in recognition of gifts from university trustee Kavitark "Ram" Shriram and his wife, Vidjealatchoumy "Vijay" Shriram. The couple have provided $57 million in support for the new Shriram Center for Bioengineering & Chemical Engineering, the fourth and final building in the university's new Science and Engineering Quad. The Shrirams also will endow the departmental chair in the Department of Bioengineering, bringing their total philanthropic support in this area to $61 million.

Last modified Tue, 10 Jun, 2014 at 12:08

Shocking Stanford video reveals the surprising truth about cell wall growth

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Research News

Researchers use new techniques to document how cells can conceal growth, then suddenly swell like raisins into grapes; study is a ‘paradigm shift’ in understanding osmotic shock that may lead to new strategies for fighting bacterial disease.

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Understanding Cell Wall Growth Better
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New techniques document how cells can conceal growth, then suddenly swell.

For a century biologists have thought they understood how the gooey growth that occurs inside cells caused their protective outer walls to expand.

Now, using new microscopic video techniques, Stanford researchers have captured the visual evidence to prove the prevailing wisdom wrong.

Last modified Thu, 29 May, 2014 at 14:55

Stanford bioengineers study how form and function unite to create the dynamic architecture of life

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Studying the proteins that build and maintain cells helps to reveal the molecular underpinnings of disease and health, and suggests new ways to bioengineer organisms for medicinal or industrial tasks.

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Form and Function Animate Cells
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Stanford bioengineers study cell architecture to help explain mechanisms behind disease and health.

Architects often say that “form follows function” to suggest that structures should be designed to fit their intended purposes.

Last modified Fri, 16 May, 2014 at 14:58

Stanford bioengineers develop ‘molecular stethoscope’ that uses RNA to track the dynamics of fetal development and disease

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This new technique, which tracks RNA levels in blood samples, offers more information than DNA analysis. It's like having a video rather than a snapshot to help figure out what the body is doing, and why.

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Molecular Stethoscope
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Bioengineers' new device uses RNA to monitor fetal health.

Recent research has shown that tiny fragments of DNA circulating in a person’s blood can allow scientists to monitor cancer growth and even get a sneak peek into a developing fetus’ gene sequences. But isolating and sequencing these bits of genetic material renders little insight into how that DNA is used to generate the dizzying array of cells, tissues and biological processes that define our bodies and our lives.

Last modified Mon, 2 Jun, 2014 at 10:52

Three Stanford Engineering professors are elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

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Announcement

Daphne Koller, Stephen Quake and Mendel Rosenblum to become members of one of the country's oldest and most prestigious honorary learned societies.

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Honorary Society Elects Three Stanford Engineers
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American Academy of Arts and Sciences elects three Engineering faculty.

American Academy of Arts and Sciences has elected three professors from the Stanford School of Engineering as members of its 2014 class.

Mendel Rosenblum, Stephen Quake and Daphne Koller will be inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. (Photo: Stanford Engineering)

The new members from Stanford Engineering are:

Last modified Wed, 30 Apr, 2014 at 8:15