Bioengineering

Stanford scientists observe brain activity in real time

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Type: 
Research News

A Stanford Bio-X team of scientists invented tools for watching mice brain nerves send signals in real time. The technique will make it easier to study brain functions and help develop therapies for brain diseases.

Slug: 
Observing Brain Activity in Real Time
Short Dek: 
Stanford team's technique will make it easier to study brain functions and help develop therapies for brain diseases.

Two Stanford scientists have worked together to create tools for observing nerves in living animals that signal between themselves in real time. Observing the glowing trails of light spreading between connected nerves will help scientists understand how those individual signals add up to the complex collection of a person's thoughts and memories.

Last modified Tue, 22 Apr, 2014 at 11:12

Stanford researchers develop a single-cell genomics technique to reverse engineer the developing lung

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Research News

How do embryos form the cells in our lungs, muscles, nerves and other tissues? A new process decodes the genetic instructions that enable the all-purpose cells of the embryo to multiply and transform into the many specialized cell types in the body.

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Reverse Engineering the Lung
Short Dek: 
Stanford engineers decode the genetic instructions that enable the embryonic cells to multiply and transform into specialized cell types.

Consider the marvel of the embryo. It begins as a glob of identical cells that change shape and function as they multiply to become the cells of our lungs, muscles, nerves and all the other specialized tissues of the body.

Now, in a feat of reverse tissue engineering, Stanford researchers have begun to unravel the complex genetic coding that allows embryonic cells to proliferate and transform into all of the specialized cells that perform myriad biological tasks.

Last modified Thu, 17 Apr, 2014 at 11:09

Inspired by a music box, Stanford bioengineer creates $5 chemistry set

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Research News

Manu Prakash won a contest to develop the 21st-century chemistry set. His version, based on a toy music box, is small, robust, programmable and costs $5. It can inspire young scientists and also address developing-world problems such as water quality and health.

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The 21st Century Chemistry Set
Short Dek: 
Bioengineer hopes to aid developing world with $5 toy-like device.

When Manu Prakash was young he had a thing about flames. He's not encouraging all kids to follow his fiery lead – he did burn one hand pretty badly – but he thinks kids should explore more when it comes to learning about science. That's the idea behind his programmable, toy-like device that won a competition to "reimagine the chemistry set for the 21st century."

Last modified Thu, 10 Apr, 2014 at 11:38

Stanford researchers survey protein family that helps the brain form synapses

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Research News

Groundbreaking study finds hundreds of variants of neurexin proteins, offering new evidence linking these differences to complex brain functions and disorders like autism.

Slug: 
Synaptic Protein Studied
Short Dek: 
Stanford researchers collaborate to study a family of brain proteins linked to autism.

Neuroscientists and bioengineers at Stanford are working together to solve a mystery: How does nature construct the different types of synapses that connect neurons – the brain cells that monitor nerve impulses, control muscles and form thoughts.

Last modified Wed, 19 Mar, 2014 at 10:32

Manu Prakash's 50-cent microscope that folds like origami

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Type: 
Research Profile

The Foldscope is a fully functional microscope that can be laser- or die-cut out of paper for about 50 cents.

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Manu Prakash's 50-Cent Microscope
Short Dek: 
The device can be cut from paper and fold like oragami.

 

Last modified Fri, 7 Mar, 2014 at 12:23

Stanford engineers brave the 'vomit comet' to improve astronauts' heart health

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Research Profile

When humans go into space, the reduced gravity can weaken the heart's ability to pump hard in response to a crisis. Stanford student researchers are developing a simple device to monitor an astronaut's heart function, and have flown in near-zero gravity to show that it works.

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Astronaut Heart Health
Short Dek: 
Device measures heart function in near-zero gravity.

The human heart was not meant to pump in space.

Early astronauts in the Apollo program performed every conceivable physical test to ensure that they were each at the pinnacle of human fitness. And yet, when they returned to Earth after just a few days in space, they felt dizzy when standing and tests showed that each beat of their heart pumped less blood than it had before the mission.

Last modified Wed, 16 Apr, 2014 at 12:28

Shedding a light on pain: A technique developed by Stanford bioengineers could lead to new treatments

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Type: 
Research Profile

Stanford researchers have developed mice whose sensitivity to pain can be dialed up or down by shining light on their paws. The research could help scientists understand and eventually treat chronic pain in humans.

Slug: 
Shedding Light on Pain
Short Dek: 
A technique developed by Stanford scientists could lead to new treatments.

The mice in Scott Delp's lab, unlike their human counterparts, can get pain relief from the glow of a yellow light.

Last modified Wed, 26 Feb, 2014 at 10:00

Stanford Bio-X Poster Session

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Join us for a Bio-X Poster Session on March 3, 2014.

Posters will be presented by Bio-X Fellows, Travel Awardees, Bio-X Affiliates and Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grant Awardees. The Bio-X poster session offers and excellent venue for informal discussion with colleagues from both academia and industry.

Date/Time: 
Monday, March 3, 2014. 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location: 
Nexus Cafe, Clark Center

Last modified Tue, 11 Feb, 2014 at 14:49

BioX Event: ReMS Lecture

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Vanessa Lopez-Pajares, PhD
A LncRNA-transcription factor network regulates epidermal regeneration

Howard Chang, MD, PhD
How stem cells forget

Date/Time: 
Thursday, February 13, 2014. 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: 
Lokey SIM1 Room G1002
Contact Info: 
sreiff@stanford.edu

Last modified Tue, 11 Feb, 2014 at 14:38

Stanford researchers discover how parts of the brain work together, or alone

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Research News

Our brains have billions of neurons grouped into different regions. These regions often work alone but sometimes must join forces. How do regions communicate selectively?

Slug: 
How brain regions communicate
Short Dek: 
Researchers find communication system between brain regions.

Stanford researchers may have solved a riddle about the inner workings of the brain, which consists of billions of neurons, organized into many different regions, with each region primarily responsible for different tasks.

Last modified Mon, 3 Feb, 2014 at 12:34