Bioengineering

Stanford research suggests football helmet tests may not account for concussion-prone actions

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Type: 
Research News

Mounting evidence suggests that concussions in football are caused by the sudden rotation of the skull. David Camarillo's lab at Stanford has evidence that suggests current football helmet tests don't account for these movements.

Slug: 
Football Helmet Tests Questioned
Short Dek: 
Stanford research suggests the tests may not account for concussion-prone actions.

When modern football helmets were introduced, they all but eliminated traumatic skull fractures caused by blunt force impacts. Mounting evidence, however, suggests that concussions are caused by a different type of head motion, namely brain and skull rotation.

Now, a group of Stanford engineers has produced a collection of results that suggest that current helmet-testing equipment and techniques are not optimized for evaluating these additional injury-causing elements.

Last modified Mon, 20 Jul, 2015 at 12:16

Leonardo Art/Science Evening Rendezvous (LASER Series)

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    Leonardo Art Science Evening RendezvouxThursday, August 13, 2015
    7:00 pm
    Li Ka Shing, Room 120

 

Date/Time: 
Thursday, August 13, 2015. 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Office of Science Outreach
Contact Info: 
scaruffi@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Fri, 10 Jul, 2015 at 10:47

Just add water: Stanford engineers develop a computer that operates on water droplets

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Type: 
Research News

Manu Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have developed a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets. Their goal is to design a new class of computers that can precisely control and manipulate physical matter.

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Water Droplet Computer
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Assistant Professor Manu Prakash and his students have developed a computer that operates on the physics of water droplets.

Computers and water typically don't mix, but in Manu Prakash's lab, the two are one and the same. Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have built a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets.

Last modified Thu, 11 Jun, 2015 at 10:17

Stanford team makes biotechnology interactive with games and remote-control labs

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Research News

Through special environments called biotic processing units, bioengineers let people interact with cells like fish in an aquarium or even do simple experiments from afar.

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Making Biotechnology Interactive
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Through special environments called biotic processing units, Stanford bioengineers let people interact with cells.

In the 1950s, computers were giant machines that filled buildings and served a variety of arcane functions. Today they fit into our pockets or backpacks, and help us work, communicate and play.

"Biotechnology today is very similar to where computing technology used to be," said Ingmar Riedel-Kruse, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford.

Last modified Tue, 21 Apr, 2015 at 9:25

Professor Karl Deisseroth wins prestigious Albany Prize

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Type: 
Research News

The bioengineer and psychiatrist will be honored for his seminal role in the field of optogenetics, which allows scientists to precisely manipulate nerve-cell activity in freely moving animals to study their behavior.

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Deisseroth wins Albany Prize
Short Dek: 
The bioengineer and psychiatrist will be honored for his seminal role in the field of optogenetics.

Stanford Professor Karl Deisseroth

Professor Karl Deisseroth will receive the Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research for his pioneering work in optogenetics.

Last modified Mon, 20 Apr, 2015 at 11:40

NIST workshop at Stanford mulls ‘weights and measures’ for biotechnology

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Research News

Researchers from academia, industry and government launch effort to define standards for using bits and pieces of molecular biomachinery to create things such as vaccines, drugs and biosensors.

Slug: 
NIST standards for biotechnology
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NIST researchers launch effort to define standards for using biotechnology to create things such as vaccines, drugs and biosensors

Just as defining the meter, kilogram and second helped lay the foundation for modern commerce, new measures and standards are needed to fuel the growth of the 21st Century bioeconomy.

The desire to create these new metrics brought more than 100 researchers from academia, industry and government to Stanford University on March 31st to launch a consortium convened by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST.

Last modified Thu, 16 Apr, 2015 at 9:49

Five faculty members receive NSF Early Career Development awards

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Type: 
Research News

Assistant professors Amin Arbabian, Michael Lepech, Marco Pavone, Manu Prakash and Sindy Tang awarded grants to help promising junior faculty pursue outstanding research while also improving education.

Slug: 
Five Faculty Members Get NSF Grants
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Arbabian, Lepech, Pavone, Prakash and Tang receive Early Career Development awards.

Five Stanford Engineering faculty members have received National Science Foundation Early Career Development (CAREER) awards for 2015. The CAREER program helps promising junior faculty pursue outstanding research while also improving education.

Last modified Thu, 2 Apr, 2015 at 16:16

Christina Smolke to receive mentor award from Northern California Chapter of Association of Women in Science

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Type: 
Research News

Ellen Weaver Award surprises the associate professor of bioengineering, who was nominated by current and former students for helping them balance the demands of research and life.

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Smolke to Get AWIS Mentor Award
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Northern California Chapter of Association of Women in Science honors Stanford bioengineer.

Stanford bioengineer Christina Smolke was recently delighted and surprised to learn that she had been chosen to receive an award for student mentoring by the Northern California Chapter of the Association for Women in Science (NCC-AWIS).

“I was really touched by this,” Smolke said. “Several of my current and former students put the nomination package together, and I didn’t know about it until I got the email notifying me that I had received this award.”

Last modified Thu, 2 Apr, 2015 at 9:10

Stanford researchers unravel secrets of shape-shifting bacteria

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Research News

Six decades ago, Nobel Prize-winning geneticist Joshua Lederberg observed how bacteria could essentially go undercover in ways that might trick the human immune system. Now, using new techniques, Stanford bioengineers have created a time-lapse video that shows this process step by step.

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Secrets of Shape-Shifting Bacteria
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Stanford bioengineers show step by step how bacteria could go undercover in ways that might trick the human immune system.

Sixty years ago, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Joshua Lederberg first described a biological mystery. He showed how bacteria could lose the cell walls that define their shapes, potentially becoming less visible to the immune system, only to later revert back to their original form and regain their full infectious potential.

Last modified Wed, 18 Mar, 2015 at 13:10

Stanford engineers solve the mystery of the dancing droplets

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Type: 
Research News

Years of research satisfy a graduate student's curiosity about the molecular minuet he observed among drops of ordinary food coloring.

Slug: 
Mystery of Dancing Droplets Solved
Short Dek: 
Molecular minuet among drops of food coloring explained.

A puzzling observation, pursued through hundreds of experiments, has led Stanford researchers to a simple yet profound discovery: under certain circumstances, droplets of fluid will move like performers in a dance choreographed by molecular physics.

Last modified Thu, 12 Mar, 2015 at 9:18