Chemical Engineering

Stanford team developing gel-like padding that could help cells survive injection and heal spinal cord injuries

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Research News

A team of engineers and scientists is developing a gel to help protect cells from the trauma of being injected into an injury site. The work could help speed cell-based therapies for spinal cord injuries and other types of damage.

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Helping Cells Survive Injection
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Engineers and scientists develop a gel to help protect cells from the trauma of being injected into an injury site.

It is a turbulent and sometimes deadly life for cells injected to heal injuries. The act of being squirted through a thin needle into the site of an injury jostles the delicate cells against each other and against the needle walls. Then, once in the site of injury, they face a biological war zone of chemicals. It's no wonder, then, that treating spinal cord injuries and other damage with injected cells has been a challenge.

Last modified Wed, 17 Sep, 2014 at 12:54

Bioengineering and chemical engineering building at Stanford named for gifts from Ram and Vijay Shriram

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$61 million in support from university trustee and his wife names the Shriram Center for Bioengineering & Chemical Engineering and endows the departmental chair.

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Introducing the Shriram Center
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Bioengineering and chemical engineering building at Stanford named for gifts from Ram and Vijay Shriram

Stanford University will name a new home for bioengineering and chemical engineering in recognition of gifts from university trustee Kavitark "Ram" Shriram and his wife, Vidjealatchoumy "Vijay" Shriram. The couple have provided $57 million in support for the new Shriram Center for Bioengineering & Chemical Engineering, the fourth and final building in the university's new Science and Engineering Quad. The Shrirams also will endow the departmental chair in the Department of Bioengineering, bringing their total philanthropic support in this area to $61 million.

Last modified Tue, 10 Jun, 2014 at 12:08

Stanford ChEM-H: Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health

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Research News

Given a year to mature, the Institute for Chemical Biology is relaunching under a new name that better reflects its vision of bringing Stanford's unique interdisciplinary culture to bear at a new frontier of chemistry.

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Stanford ChEM-H
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The Institute for Chemical Biology relaunches under a new name.

Last summer Stanford launched the Institute for Chemical Biology as a joint venture of the schools of Medicine, Engineering and Humanities & Sciences with the goal of encouraging interdisciplinary research and training at a new frontier of chemistry, that of human health. Given a year to mature, the institute is relaunching under a new name that better reflects this vision: Stanford ChEM-H.

Last modified Thu, 15 May, 2014 at 10:06

Stanford research reveals new ways to study and control crystallization

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Research News

Stanford scientists help create a novel way to do time-lapse studies of crystallization that will lead to more flexible and effective electronic displays, circuits and pharmaceutical drugs.

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New Ways to Control Crystallization
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Stanford scientists' time-lapse studies will lead to improved electronic displays, circuits and drugs.

Sometimes engineers invent something before they fully comprehend why it works. To understand the "why," they must often create new tools and techniques in a virtuous cycle that improves the original invention while also advancing basic scientific knowledge.

Such was the case about two years ago, when Stanford engineers discovered how to make a more efficient type of "strained organic semiconductors" that carry currents faster, a big step toward producing flexible electronic devices that couldn't be built using rigid silicon chips.

Last modified Fri, 18 Apr, 2014 at 11:24

Stanford engineers make flexible carbon nanotube circuits more reliable and efficient

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Researchers invent a process to 'dope' carbon filaments with an additive to improve their electronic performance, paving the way for digital devices that bend.

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Improving Flexible Carbon Nanotubes
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Stanford engineers make flexible carbon nanotube circuits more reliable and efficient.

Engineers would love to create flexible electronic devices, such as e-readers that could be folded to fit into a pocket. One approach involves designing circuits based on electronic fibers known as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) instead of rigid silicon chips.

But reliability is essential. Most silicon chips are based on a type of circuit design that allows them to function flawlessly even when the device experiences power fluctuations. However, it is much more challenging to do so with CNT circuits.

Last modified Tue, 18 Mar, 2014 at 15:28

Newly discovered catalyst could lead to the low-cost, clean production of methanol, scientists say

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Research News

Scientists from Stanford, SLAC and Denmark have created a new nickel-gallium catalyst that could some day be used to convert hydrogen and carbon dioxide emissions into methanol, an important industrial chemical and potential fuel.

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Catalyst for Cheap, Clean Methanol
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New nickel-gallium catalyst could convert hydrogen and carbon dioxide emissions into methanol.

An international research team has discovered a potentially clean, low-cost way to convert carbon dioxide into methanol, a key ingredient in the production of plastics, adhesives and solvents, and a promising fuel for transportation.

Last modified Tue, 4 Mar, 2014 at 12:33

Stanford researchers identify cellular elastic that keeps nerves resilient

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A team of Stanford Bio-X scientists and engineers has found the secret to how nerves withstand the wear and tear of bending joints and moving tissues.

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How Nerves Stay Resilient
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Cellular elastic helps nerves withstand the wear and tear of bending joints and moving tissues.

Make a fist, and pity the nerve cells in your hand. Some are stretched taut across the outside of your fingers, and others are squished within your palm. Despite that, they continue to do their jobs, sending signals to detect touch or pain and controlling your muscles to release the fist or clench it tighter.

The question is how.

If nerves were like floppy strings, the constant bending and stretching could damage their delicate membranes and prevent them from sending signals to and from the spinal cord.

Last modified Wed, 26 Feb, 2014 at 10:00

Engineers teach old chemical new tricks to make cleaner fuels, fertilizers

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Research Profile

Researchers from Denmark and Stanford show how to produce industrial quantities of hydrogen without emitting carbon into the atmosphere.

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Making “Greener” Hydrogen
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Producing industrial hydrogen without carbon emissions.

University researchers from two continents have engineered an efficient and environmentally friendly catalyst for the production of molecular hydrogen (H2), a compound used extensively in modern industry to manufacture fertilizer and refine crude oil into gasoline.

Last modified Wed, 29 Jan, 2014 at 14:37

Stanford engineer shows how a modified form of graphene could be used to make an energy-efficient data storage device

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Research News

Chemical engineering researcher shows how to control the spin of electrons in a potential data storage application.

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Controlling Eectron Spin
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Controlling electron spin for data storage.

In the ongoing quest to store more data in smaller packages, a Stanford engineer has simulated how to use electric fields to control spin, a quantum property of the electrons, in a modified form of graphene.

Graphene is made from sheets of carbon atoms arranged in a lattice. Each sheet is just one atom thick. A recent paper by Elton Santos, a Stanford research fellow in chemical engineering, shows how modifying this material could create small, energy efficient storage devices with high capacities.

Last modified Thu, 19 Dec, 2013 at 15:39

Letter from the Dean

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Announcement

Stanford engineers have always tackled the biggest challenges, and the past academic year was no exception.

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New Directions

Stanford Engineering Dean Jim Plummer

Last modified Wed, 18 Dec, 2013 at 11:35