Chemical Engineering

The 40th Annual David M. Mason Lectures in Chemical Engineering

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THE DAVID M. MASON LECTURES IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING are named in honor of the late David M. Mason, who was Professor of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at Stanford University.

Date/Time: 
Monday, May 11, 2015. 8:00 am - Wednesday, May 13, 2015. 7:00 pm
Sponsors: 
Department of Chemical Engineering
Contact Info: 
650-723-7503, akjensen@stnaford.edu

Last modified Tue, 17 Feb, 2015 at 10:18

Jens Nørskov elected to NAE

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Type: 
Research News

Chemical engineering professor honored for his contributions to theoretical approaches to design of heterogeneous catalysts, linking reaction rates to microscopic catalyst properties.

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Jens Nørskov elected to NAE
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Professor honored for his contributions toto theoretical approaches to design of heterogeneous catalysts

 

Jens Norskov Jens Nørskov, the Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) for theoretical approaches to design of heterogeneous catalysts, linking reaction rates to microscopic catalyst properties.

Last modified Thu, 12 Feb, 2015 at 9:17

Stanford senior awarded 2015-16 Churchill Scholarship

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Type: 
Research News

Sophie E. Miller, a chemical engineering major at Stanford, is one of 14 Americans "of exceptional ability and outstanding achievement" who have been awarded Churchill Scholarships to study at the University of Cambridge in England for one year.

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Stanford Senior Wins Churchill Scholarship
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Chemical engineering student Sophie E. Miller will study at Cambridge.

A Stanford senior who would like to investigate nanoporous materials that have shown promise in the treatment of cancer has been awarded a 2015-16 Churchill Scholarship to pursue her research at the University of Cambridge in England.

Last modified Tue, 20 Jan, 2015 at 15:01

Stanford faculty awarded seed grants for innovative energy research

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Type: 
Research News

Stanford's Precourt Institute, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center have awarded eight seed grants to Stanford faculty for early-stage energy research.

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Seed Grants for Energy Research
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Eight grants awarded to Stanford faculty for early-stage energy research.

Stanford University's Precourt Institute for Energy, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy have awarded eight seed grants totaling about $1.5 million for promising new research in clean technology and energy efficiency.

Last modified Thu, 18 Dec, 2014 at 10:01

Stanford Engineering alumna and astronaut Mae Jemison talks about the universe

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Stanford Engineering graduate Mae Jemison, the first woman of color to go into space, will be on campus Wednesday, Dec. 3, as part of Stanford's Imagining the Universe: Cosmology in Art and Science series.

Jemison's talk will be about exploring the frontiers of science and the human potential.

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014. 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Location: 
Cemex Auditorium, Knight Management Center
Sponsors: 
Stanford Arts Institute
Contact Info: 
650-736-0705, kennedya@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis

Last modified Mon, 1 Dec, 2014 at 9:47

Three influential innovators named Stanford Engineering Heroes

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Type: 
Research News

Distinguished Stanford engineers honored for their impact on our lives and the world.

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2014 Stanford Engineering Heroes
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Three influential innovators honored for their impact on our lives and the world.

The architect of the first microprocessor, the co-creator of the first WYSIWYG and a professor who helped transform the field of chemical engineering have been named Stanford Engineering Heroes, a designation that honors professional achievements that have advanced social and economic progress and improved the human condition.

Last modified Tue, 11 Nov, 2014 at 17:34

Stanford chemical engineers borrow technique from petrochemical industry to store solar energy

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Type: 
Research News

Many high school students have zapped water with electricity to make hydrogen and oxygen. To turn that chemical process into a type of battery, researchers adapt ideas from oil refineries.

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Cheap Catalyst for Solar Storage
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Stanford engineers borrow technique from petrochemical industry to store solar energy

Chemical engineers at Stanford have designed a catalyst that could help produce vast quantities of pure hydrogen through electrolysis – the process of passing electricity through water to break hydrogen loose from oxygen in H2O.

Today, pure hydrogen, or H2, is a major commodity chemical that is generally derived from natural gas. Tens of millions of tons of hydrogen are produced each year; industrial hydrogen is important in petroleum refining and fertilizer production.

Last modified Tue, 2 Dec, 2014 at 13:36

Stanford team invents sensor that uses radio waves to detect subtle changes in pressure

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Type: 
Research News

Device is used to monitor brain pressure in lab mice as prelude to possible use with human patients; future applications of this pressure-sensing technology could lead to touch-sensitive “skin” for prosthetic devices.

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Wireless sensor measures pressure
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Sensor uses radio waves to detect subtle changes in pressure

Stanford engineers have invented a wireless pressure sensor that has already been used to measure brain pressure in lab mice with brain injuries.

The underlying technology has such broad potential that it could one day be used to create skin-like materials that can sense pressure, leading to prosthetic devices with the electronic equivalent of a sense of touch.

Last modified Fri, 10 Oct, 2014 at 9:14

Stanford's GCEP awards $10.5 million for research on renewable energy

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Type: 
Research News

Stanford scientists and an international research group receive funding to advance solar cells, batteries, renewable fuels and bioenergy.

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Multiple energy projects receive grants
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GCEP awards foster continued research into renewable energy

The Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) at Stanford University has awarded $10.5 million for seven research projects designed to advance a broad range of renewable energy technologies. The funding will be shared by six Stanford research teams and an international group from the United States and Europe.

Last modified Wed, 8 Oct, 2014 at 12:47

Stanford team developing gel-like padding that could help cells survive injection and heal spinal cord injuries

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Type: 
Research News

A team of engineers and scientists is developing a gel to help protect cells from the trauma of being injected into an injury site. The work could help speed cell-based therapies for spinal cord injuries and other types of damage.

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Helping Cells Survive Injection
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Engineers and scientists develop a gel to help protect cells from the trauma of being injected into an injury site.

It is a turbulent and sometimes deadly life for cells injected to heal injuries. The act of being squirted through a thin needle into the site of an injury jostles the delicate cells against each other and against the needle walls. Then, once in the site of injury, they face a biological war zone of chemicals. It's no wonder, then, that treating spinal cord injuries and other damage with injected cells has been a challenge.

Last modified Wed, 17 Sep, 2014 at 11:54