Electrical Engineering

​Yi Cui: How nano materials can help improve everything from batteries to face masks

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By focusing on structures that are infinitesimally small, a prolific engineer initiates a series of very big things.

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​Yi Cui: How nano materials can help improve everything from batteries to face masks
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By focusing on structures that are infinitesimally small, a prolific engineer initiates a series of very big things.

Yi Cui | Photo by Matt Beardsley/SLAC

           

What do a battery, a facemask and a solar cell have in common?

Last modified Fri, 29 Apr, 2016 at 9:26

How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage

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A team of engineers obtain a first look inside phase-changing nanoparticles and find that their structure significantly influences performance.

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How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage
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A team of engineers obtain a first look inside phase-changing nanoparticles and find that their structure significantly influences performance.

Stanford engineers studying the structures of phase-changing nanoparticles have found that shape matters. Materials composed of cubes and pyramids, for instance, may yield more efficient batteries than those made of icosahedrons which are 20-sided polyhedrons. | Image courtesy Dionne Group

Last modified Tue, 26 Apr, 2016 at 12:11

​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin

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A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

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​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin
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A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

Can we build better prostheses? | REUTERS/Mary Schwalm

Last modified Fri, 22 Apr, 2016 at 13:57

​John Hennessy: Great leadership can be learned

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Stanford University President John Hennessy offers his take on important leadership qualities, Silicon Valley, and the future of higher education.​

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​John Hennessy: Great leadership can be learned
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Stanford University President John Hennessy offers his take on important leadership qualities, Silicon Valley, and the future of higher education.​

Stanford University President John Hennessy discusses some of the most powerful lessons he’s learned as leader of one of the world’s most complex and dynamic institutions of higher education. In conversation with Tina Seelig, director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, at the DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series, Hennessy also shares insights from his entrepreneurial career in the high-tech industry.

Last modified Wed, 13 Apr, 2016 at 11:44

​Shan Wang: How magnetic nanoparticles can be used as medical sensors

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A team of researchers tracks disease the way naturalists track animals in the wild.

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​Shan Wang: How magnetic nanoparticles can be used as medical sensors
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A team of researchers tracks disease the way naturalists track animals in the wild.

A time-lapse image shows the trajectories of tumor cells (green) after being stained with fluorescent dyes and labeled with magnetic nanoparticles. | Image courtesy of R. J. Wilson, C.M. Earhart and S. X. Wang

Last modified Tue, 12 Apr, 2016 at 16:55

​Ada Poon: How miniaturized electronic devices can be used as medical therapeutics

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​Inspired by personal experience, an engineer pioneers the development of ‘electroceuticals’ that can dispense treatments or monitor functions deep inside the body.

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​Ada Poon: How miniaturized electronic devices can be used as medical therapeutics
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An engineer pioneers ‘electroceuticals’ that can dispense treatments or monitor functions inside the body.

Ada Poon is developing tiny electronic devices to dispense treatments or monitor functions deep inside the body. | Photo courtesy of Poon Lab

Last modified Mon, 25 Apr, 2016 at 8:56

How could we use the tiniest specs of diamonds?

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Extracting nanodiamonds from crude oil could help produce next-generation tools for imaging and communications.

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How could we use the tiniest specs of diamonds?
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Extracting nanodiamonds from crude oil could help to produce next-generation tools for imaging and communications.

Too small to see with the naked eye, diamondoids are visible only when they clump together in fine, sugar-like crystals like these. | Photo by Christopher Smith, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Last modified Mon, 11 Apr, 2016 at 8:20

What will the batteries and electronics of the future look like?

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A team of researchers peer deep into materials with ultrafast science.

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What will the batteries and electronics of the future look like?
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A team of researchers peer deep into materials with ultrafast science.

Visualizing the properties of nanoscale materials at ultrafast time scales | Photo courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Last modified Thu, 31 Mar, 2016 at 16:42

The body's biggest defender may one day be smaller than you think

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Research Profile

A group of researchers shows how nanomedicine is changing the path of cancer diagnosis and treatment.

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The body's biggest defender may one day be smaller than you think
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A group of researchers shows how nanomedicine is changing the path of cancer diagnosis and treatment.

T lymphocytes and cancer cell | iStock/luismmolina

Last modified Fri, 18 Mar, 2016 at 13:50

Musical training gives Stanford engineers a creative lift

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A fellowship offered jointly by the School of Engineering and the Friends of Music at Stanford provides music lessons to engineering students.

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Musical training gives Stanford engineers a creative lift
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A fellowship offered jointly by the School of Engineering and the Friends of Music at Stanford provides music lessons to engineering students.

Stanford engineers can get scholarships to study music and other arts.  | REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak

Last modified Wed, 16 Mar, 2016 at 9:36