Electrical Engineering

PhD candidates Jayant Charthad and Steven Bell receive 2015 Centennial Teaching Assistant Award

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Electrical engineering students honored for outstanding teaching among TA's in the schools of humanities and sciences, earth sciences, and engineering.

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EE Students Win TA Award
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PhD candidates Jayant Charthad and Steven Bell receive 2015 Centennial Teaching Assistant Award.

 

Stanford PhD candidate Steven BellSteven Bell and Jayant Charthad, PhD candidates in electrical engineering, have received the 2015 Centennial Teaching Assistant Award. The Centennial award program recognizes outstanding teaching by TA's in the schools of humanities and sciences, earth sciences, and engineering.

Nominated by faculty, peers and previous students, each will receive a $500 prize and certificate.

Last modified Fri, 19 Jun, 2015 at 9:49

Stanford engineers find a simple yet clever way to boost chip speeds

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Inside each chip are millions of tiny wires to transport data; wrapping them in a protective layer of graphene could boost speeds by 30 percent.

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Graphene Wrap Boosts Chip Speed
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Wrapping semiconductor wires in graphene improves performance.

A typical computer chip includes millions of transistors connected with an extensive network of copper wires. Although chip wires are unimaginably short and thin compared with household wires, both have one thing in common: in each case the copper is wrapped within a protective sheath.

For years a material called tantalum nitride has formed a protective layer around chip wires.

Now Stanford-led experiments demonstrate that a different sheathing material, graphene, can help electrons scoot through tiny copper wires in chips more quickly.

Last modified Wed, 17 Jun, 2015 at 12:20

Stanford engineers discover the limitation of a popular technique for one-way optical data transmission on computer chips

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Backward leakage of light beams constrains ability to keep optical information flowing in only one direction, research shows.

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Limits of Optical Data Flow
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Stanford engineers discover constraints in a popular technique for achieving one-way optical data transmission.

Optics, a form of data transmission that utilizes beams of light, has the promise to outperform the beams of electrons that drive your computer or smartphone. Engineers have long sought a way to miniaturize optical technology, which is present in today's fast-paced fiber-optic cables, so they can bring the speed and efficiency of light-based data transmission to a computer chip.

Last modified Mon, 8 Jun, 2015 at 10:52

Stanford engineers' breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers

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Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires.

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Advance in Light-Based Computing
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Stanford engineers' breakthrough brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires.

Stanford electrical engineer Jelena Vuckovic wants to make computers faster and more efficient by reinventing how they send data back and forth between chips, where the work is done.

In computers today, data is pushed through wires as a stream of electrons. That takes a lot of power, which helps explain why laptops get so warm.

Last modified Thu, 28 May, 2015 at 16:40

Krishna Shenoy and Joanna Wysocka named HHMI investigators

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The funding will aid Shenoy’s efforts to develop brain-machine interfaces and allow Wysocka to continue exploring the earliest steps of human development.

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Shenoy Named HHMI Investigator
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Howard Hughes Medical Institute funds research by electrical engineer Krishna Shenoy and Joanna Wysocka in the School of Medicine.

Two Stanford University researchers are among 26 scientists from 19 institutions newly appointed as Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators, the institute announced today. They were chosen through a competitive selection process from a pool of nearly 900 candidates.

Last modified Tue, 19 May, 2015 at 12:21

Stanford engineers observe the moment when a mind is changed

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A new algorithm enables a moment-by-moment analysis of brain activity each time a laboratory monkey reaches this way or that during an experiment. It's like reading the monkey's mind.

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Observing a Change of Mind
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Algorithm enables a moment-by-moment analysis of brain activity each time a laboratory monkey reaches this way or that.

Researchers studying how the brain makes decisions have, for the first time, recorded the moment-by-moment fluctuations in brain signals that occur when a monkey making free choices has a change of mind.

The findings result from experiments led by electrical engineering Professor Krishna Shenoy, whose Stanford lab focuses on movement control and neural prostheses – such as artificial arms – controlled by the user's brain.

Last modified Tue, 5 May, 2015 at 11:48

Stanford Engineering Hero Ted Hoff honored as the principal architect of the microprocessor

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Hoff led the team of engineers that produced the revolutionary Intel 4004 microprocessor in 1971.

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Stanford Engineering Hero Ted Hoff
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Hoff led the team of engineers that produced the revolutionary Intel 4004 microprocessor in 1971.

Marcian “Ted” Hoff earned a standing ovation when he spoke about inventing the microprocessor during a recent event at which he was honored as a Stanford Engineering Hero.

Since its inception in 2010 the Heroes program has recognized Stanford engineers who have profoundly advanced human, social and economic progress through engineering.

Hoff is best known as the principal architect of the groundbreaking 4004 microprocessor that was released by Intel in 1971.

Last modified Mon, 4 May, 2015 at 10:36

Nicholas McKeown among 10 Stanford professors elected to AAAS 2015 class

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American Academy of Arts and Sciences is one of the country's oldest and most prestigious honorary learned societies.

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McKeown Elected to AAAS
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American Academy of Arts and Sciences is one of the country's oldest and most prestigious honorary learned societies.

Stanford Professor Nicholas McKeownNicholas McKeown, a professor of computer science and electrical engineering, is among 10 Stanford professors recently elected as members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The academy is one of the country's oldest and most prestigious honorary learned societies, and a leading center for independent policy research.

Stanford's new members this year:

Last modified Thu, 23 Apr, 2015 at 11:19

ACM Council on Women honors Jennifer Widom as innovator in database systems

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Professor of computer science and electrical engineering is named 2015-2016 Athena Lecturer for launching new research areas in the database field.

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ACM Council on Women Honors Widom
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Professor of computer science and electrical engineering is named 2015-2016 Athena Lecturer for innovations in database field.

The Association for Computing Machinery’s Council on Women in Computing (ACM-W), has named Stanford Engineering’s Jennifer Widom the 2015-2016 Athena Lecturer for pioneering foundations, architecture and applications of database systems.

Last modified Tue, 7 Apr, 2015 at 12:39

Five faculty members receive NSF Early Career Development awards

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Assistant professors Amin Arbabian, Michael Lepech, Marco Pavone, Manu Prakash and Sindy Tang awarded grants to help promising junior faculty pursue outstanding research while also improving education.

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Five Faculty Members Get NSF Grants
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Arbabian, Lepech, Pavone, Prakash and Tang receive Early Career Development awards.

Five Stanford Engineering faculty members have received National Science Foundation Early Career Development (CAREER) awards for 2015. The CAREER program helps promising junior faculty pursue outstanding research while also improving education.

Last modified Thu, 2 Apr, 2015 at 16:16