Electrical Engineering

Meet "Hedgehog": Your tour guide to asteroids, comets and other things that whirl around the solar system

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Type: 
Research News

A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

Slug: 
Robotic space hedgehog will hop, flip and spin to explore asteroids.
Short Dek: 
A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

Your best guess is that the landscape is as inhospitable as it gets: an irregular range of sharp boulders and loose rubble piles strewn among jagged crevasses and deep troughs of dust. But then again, it’s just a guess because no one’s ever actually seen this landscape up close. Now imagine that you need to send a robot across that landscape, from a perch at the lip of a steep crater to the edge of an ice-encrusted hole 1,000 meters away. And imagine that gravity is a tiny fraction of what we have on Earth.

Last modified Fri, 5 Feb, 2016 at 9:51

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Seminar - John Hennessy

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Wednesday, February 3, 2016
4:30pm
NVIDIA Auditorium, Huang Engineering Center

ETL Seminar Series, Wednesdays, 4:30 pm

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2016. 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Department of Management Science & Engineering, Stanford Technology Ventures Program, Business Association of Stanford Entrepreneurial Students
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Thu, 28 Jan, 2016 at 12:53

A group of scholars look to early 20th century radio technology to help improve Internet security

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Type: 
Research News

A new study shows how harnessing the quantum properties of light can create a transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping.

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Scholars look to radio for Internet security
Short Dek: 
Study shows properties of light can create transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping

Imagine communicating with your bank, the IRS or your doctor by way of an Internet that was perfectly secure. Your most private data would be protected with absolute certainty and, better yet, if any bad actor were to try to eavesdrop you would know immediately. Such is the promise of secure quantum communication. 

Last modified Tue, 2 Feb, 2016 at 9:14

Building Games in Unreal Engine with Free Assets

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11:30 am - 1:30 pm
Shriram 104

 

Date/Time: 
Saturday, January 23, 2016. 11:30 am - 1:30 pm

Last modified Fri, 22 Jan, 2016 at 15:13

ME Women's Seminar, Narges Bani Asadi - Learn To Lead, Lead to Learn

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The ME Graduate Women's Group has offered ME/ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives, a 1-unit credit seminar, every year since the group's inception in 1998. For credit or not, everyone is welcome to come! Speakers are asked to address the factors, experiences, and lessons that have been particularly important to their success in industry, academia, and... life. 

4:15pm Social | 4:30pm Seminar starts

Date/Time: 
Thursday, January 21, 2016. 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Sandia National Laboratories, General Motors, AT&T, Lockheed Martin, the Vice Provost of Engineering Education, and the School of Engineering Alumni Relations Program
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Thu, 14 Jan, 2016 at 11:37

ME Women's Seminar, Carol Espy-Wilson - Learn To Lead, Lead to Learn

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The ME Graduate Women's Group has offered ME/ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives, a 1-unit credit seminar, every year since the group's inception in 1998. For credit or not, everyone is welcome to come! Speakers are asked to address the factors, experiences, and lessons that have been particularly important to their success in industry, academia, and... life. 

The seminars are every Thursday, January 7 - March 10, 2016

Date/Time: 
Thursday, January 14, 2016. 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Location: 
Huang Engineering Building, Room 300
Sponsors: 
Sandia National Laboratories, General Motors, AT&T, Lockheed Martin, the Vice Provost of Engineering Education, and the School of Engineering Alumni Relations Program

Last modified Tue, 12 Jan, 2016 at 11:02

Careers and Research: a Personal Perspective - John L. Hennessy

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Translation Research and Applied Medicine (TRAM) Lecture

Careers and Research: a Personal Perspective
3:00-4:00 PM, Berg Hall – Li Ka Shing Center, Reception will follow.

John L. Hennessy

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, January 13, 2016. 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Contact Info: 
jlili@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Open to all members of the campus community.

Last modified Mon, 11 Jan, 2016 at 16:38

New microscopy technique maps mechanical properties of living cells

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Type: 
Research News

Researchers have developed a new way to use atomic force microscopy to rapidly measure the mechanical properties of cells at the nanometer scale, an advance that could pave the way for better understanding immune disorders and cancer.

Slug: 
Technique maps properties of living cells
Short Dek: 
Measuring mechanical properties of cells to understand immune disorders, cancer

In his role as a pediatrician, Manish Butte, MD, PhD, will often push and prod a patient’s abdomen, feeling for abnormalities — a swollen spleen, a hardened lymph node or an unusual lump in the intestines or liver. There are still some things that can only be gleaned by touch, and Butte believes this notion applies to individual cells as well.

Last modified Wed, 3 Feb, 2016 at 8:08

Stanford-led skyscraper-style chip design could boost electronic performance by factor of a thousand

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Type: 
Research Profile

In modern computer systems, processor and memory chips are laid out like single-story structures in a suburb. But suburban layouts waste time and energy. A new skyscraper-like design, based on materials more advanced than silicon, provides the next computing platform.

Slug: 
Skyscraper-style chip moves data faster
Short Dek: 
New design, based on materials more advanced than silicon, provides the next computing platform

For decades, engineers have designed computer systems with processors and memory chips laid out like single-story structures in a suburb. Wires connect these chips like streets, carrying digital traffic between the processors that compute data and the memory chips that store it.

But suburban-style layouts create long commutes and regular traffic jams in electronic circuits, wasting time and energy.

Last modified Fri, 11 Dec, 2015 at 9:20