Electrical Engineering

Three influential innovators named Stanford Engineering Heroes

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Distinguished Stanford engineers honored for their impact on our lives and the world.

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2014 Stanford Engineering Heroes
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Three influential innovators honored for their impact on our lives and the world.

The architect of the first microprocessor, the co-creator of the first WYSIWYG and a professor who helped transform the field of chemical engineering have been named Stanford Engineering Heroes, a designation that honors professional achievements that have advanced social and economic progress and improved the human condition.

Last modified Tue, 11 Nov, 2014 at 17:34

Making Personalized Medicine Practical

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Personalized medicine will bring with it the problem of storing and processing the vast amounts genetic information needed to tailor medical care to individual needs. Stanford electrical engineers have an answer.

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Genome compression improved
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Stanford engineers learn to store and process the vast genetic information needed to tailor medical care to individuals.

In 2003, the Human Genome Project culminated in the successful sequencing of the more than 3 billion base pairs making up a single human genome, costing an international consortium of researchers 13 years and $3 billion to complete.

Today, similar sequencing can happen in weeks for about $4,000. But soon, science will realize the hallowed “$1,000 genome,” – the symbolic marker of entry into the era of personalized medicine, in which people have their DNA sequenced to help tailor medical care to their specific needs.

Last modified Thu, 20 Nov, 2014 at 10:52

Stanford engineers develop tiny, sound-powered chip to serve as medical device

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Using ultrasound to deliver power wirelessly, Stanford researchers are working on a new generation of medical devices that would be planted deep inside the body to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain.

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Sound-powered Medical Implant
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Stanford engineers develop tiny, sound-powered medical implant to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain.

Medical researchers would like to plant tiny electronic devices deep inside our bodies to monitor biological processes and deliver pinpoint therapies to treat illness or relieve pain.

But so far engineers have been unable to make such devices small and useful enough. Providing electric power to medical implants has been one stumbling block. Using wires or batteries to deliver power tends to make implants too big, too clumsy – or both.

Last modified Thu, 16 Oct, 2014 at 8:43

Stanford engineers developing miniature wireless device to create better way of studying chronic pain

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A team of Stanford engineers is creating a small wireless device that will improve studies of chronic pain. The engineers hope to use what they learn to develop better therapies for the condition, which costs the economy $600 billion a year.

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Wireless device to study pain
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Stanford engineers are creating a small wireless device to improve studies of chronic pain

Ada Poon, a Stanford assistant professor of electrical engineering, is a master at building minuscule wireless devices that function in the body and can be powered remotely. Now, she and collaborators in bioengineering and anesthesia want to leverage this technology to develop a way of studying – and eventually developing treatments for – pain.

Last modified Wed, 8 Oct, 2014 at 12:59

Two Stanford professors earn National Medal of Science

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Thomas Kailath and Burton Richter have been awarded the nation's highest honor for achievement in the fields of engineering and science.

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President Honors Stanford Engineer
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Engineering professor Thomas Kailath and physics professor Burton Richter earn National Medal of Science.

Stanford Professor Emeritus Thomas Kailath

President Obama on Friday awarded the National Medal of Science to Stanford professors emeriti Thomas Kailath and Burton Richter. The award is the nation's highest honor for achievement in the fields of science and engineering.

Last modified Fri, 3 Oct, 2014 at 13:53

New electrical engineering curriculum infused with a jolt of ‘maker’ energy

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New classes allow undergraduates to use EE tools and techniques to make gizmos and systems from day one.

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New EE Curriculum
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Classes allow undergraduates to make gizmos and systems from day one.

Undergraduate Diniana Piekutowski, EE '16, came to Stanford with an interest in sustainability that she could have pursued through several different majors.

“I eventually decided on Electrical Engineering because I wanted to learn the essence of energy and electronics,” Piekutowski said. “To me, EE is a harmonic balance of theory and application.”

Last modified Tue, 23 Sep, 2014 at 15:25

Stanford engineer aims to connect the world with ant-size radios

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Costing just pennies to make, tiny radios on a chip are designed to serve as controllers or sensors for the 'Internet of Things.'

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Radios on a Chip
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Stanford engineer aims to connect the world with ant-size radios that will control the 'Internet of Things.'

A Stanford engineering team, in collaboration with researchers from UC Berkeley, has built a radio the size of an ant, a device so energy efficient that it gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to its receiving antenna – no batteries required.

Designed to compute, execute and relay commands, this tiny wireless chip costs pennies to fabricate – making it cheap enough to become the missing link between the Internet as we know it and the linked-together smart gadgets envisioned in the "Internet of Things."

Last modified Thu, 11 Sep, 2014 at 12:03

Stanford engineer invents safe way to transfer energy to medical implants

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Safer, Smaller Medical Implants
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Stanford engineer invents safe way to transfer energy to medical chips in the body
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A wireless system developed by Assistant Professor Ada Poon uses the same power as a cell phone to safely transmit energy to chips the size of a grain of rice. The technology paves the way for new "electroceutical" devices to treat illness or alleviate pain. 

Last modified Tue, 23 Sep, 2014 at 13:32

Stanford engineer helps determine how the brain learns new tasks

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Research revealing the neural basis for why learning new tasks can be difficult could lead to improved therapies for stroke and other brain injuries.

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How Brain Learns New Tasks
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Stanford engineer joins research that reveals the neural basis for why learning new tasks can be difficult.

Scientists from Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh and Stanford have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why people have a relatively easier time learning new skills if they are related to abilities they have already mastered.

Last modified Thu, 4 Sep, 2014 at 9:36

International laser scholars converge on Stanford to shed light on photonics research

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Siegman International School on Lasers, named in honor of a deceased Stanford engineer who was a colossus in this important field, completes its inaugural session.

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Laser School Completes First Session
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Siegman International School on Lasers draws scholars from around the world.

The new Siegman International School on Lasers at Stanford functions as a tacit acknowledgement of the ubiquity and importance of laser technology. Fifty years ago, lasers were a curiosity. Today, they are deeply embedded in virtually every technological sector: medicine, aviation, communications, energy production, automobiles and agriculture.

Last modified Fri, 29 Aug, 2014 at 13:11