Electrical Engineering

Stanford faculty awarded seed grants for innovative energy research

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Research News

Stanford's Precourt Institute, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center have awarded eight seed grants to Stanford faculty for early-stage energy research.

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Seed Grants for Energy Research
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Eight grants awarded to Stanford faculty for early-stage energy research.

Stanford University's Precourt Institute for Energy, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy have awarded eight seed grants totaling about $1.5 million for promising new research in clean technology and energy efficiency.

Last modified Thu, 18 Dec, 2014 at 10:01

Stanford team combines logic, memory to build a 'high-rise' chip

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Stanford researchers are building layers of logic and memory into skyscraper chips that are smaller, faster, cheaper – and taller.

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Taller Is Better
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Stanford Engineering team combines logic, memory to build a 'high-rise' chip

For decades, the mantra of electronics has been smaller, faster, cheaper.

Today, Stanford engineers add a fourth word – taller.

At a conference in San Francisco, a Stanford team will reveal how to build high-rise chips that could leapfrog the performance of the single-story logic and memory chips on today's circuit cards.

Those circuit cards are like busy cities in which logic chips compute and memory chips store data. But when the computer gets busy, the wires connecting logic and memory can get jammed.

Last modified Tue, 16 Dec, 2014 at 9:25

Four Stanford Engineering professors named IEEE fellows

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Thomas Lee, Sanjay Lall, Boris Murmann and Christos Kozyrakis were recognized for their extraordinary achievements in engineering.

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Four New IEEE Fellows
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Thomas Lee, Sanjay Lall, Boris Murmann and Christos Kozyrakis were recognized for extraordinary achievements.

Thomas Lee, Sanjay Lall, Boris Murmann and Christos Kozyrakis, all members of the electrical engineering faculty at Stanford, have been named IEEE fellows in recognition of their extraordinary achievements in engineering.

Last modified Fri, 5 Dec, 2014 at 13:14

Stanford Engineering alum James Spilker wins 2015 IEEE Edison Medal

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Spilker, a consulting professor at Stanford Engineering, was honored for "contributions to the technology and implementation of civilian GPS navigation systems."

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Spilker Wins IEEE Edison Medal
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Alum honored for "contributions to the technology and implementation of civilian GPS navigation systems."

 

James J. SpilkerStanford Engineering alumnus James J. Spilker has been awarded the 2015 IEEE Edison Medal. Spilker, who received his BS, MS and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford, is executive chairman of AOSense Inc. and a consulting professor of aeronautics and astronautics at Stanford.

Last modified Thu, 4 Dec, 2014 at 14:43

Stanford Engineering's Jim Plummer to be awarded IEEE Founders Medal

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Research News

Former dean of School of Engineering honored for his role in fostering innovative, interdisciplinary and globally focused education.

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IEEE Honors Jim Plummer
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Former dean to receive IEEE Founders Medal for his role in fostering innovative, interdisciplinary and globally focused education.

Jim Plummer, a former dean of Stanford Engineering and current member of its electrical engineering faculty, will receive the 2015 IEEE Founders Medal, joining a select group of innovators who have been similarly honored during the past six decades.

Last modified Wed, 3 Dec, 2014 at 10:53

Stanford engineers invent high-tech mirror to beam heat away from buildings into space

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Research News

A new ultrathin multilayered material can cool buildings without air conditioning by radiating warmth from inside the buildings into space while also reflecting sunlight to reduce incoming heat.

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Beaming Heat into Space
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A new ultrathin multilayered material can cool buildings without air conditioning by radiating warmth from inside the buildings into space.

Stanford engineers have invented a revolutionary coating material that can help cool buildings, even on sunny days, by radiating heat away from the buildings and sending it directly into space.

A team led by electrical engineering Professor Shanhui Fan and research associate Aaswath Raman reported this energy-saving breakthrough in the journal Nature.

Last modified Mon, 1 Dec, 2014 at 10:11

Three influential innovators named Stanford Engineering Heroes

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Distinguished Stanford engineers honored for their impact on our lives and the world.

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2014 Stanford Engineering Heroes
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Three influential innovators honored for their impact on our lives and the world.

The architect of the first microprocessor, the co-creator of the first WYSIWYG and a professor who helped transform the field of chemical engineering have been named Stanford Engineering Heroes, a designation that honors professional achievements that have advanced social and economic progress and improved the human condition.

Last modified Tue, 11 Nov, 2014 at 17:34

Making Personalized Medicine Practical

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Personalized medicine will bring with it the problem of storing and processing the vast amounts genetic information needed to tailor medical care to individual needs. Stanford electrical engineers have an answer.

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Genome compression improved
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Stanford engineers learn to store and process the vast genetic information needed to tailor medical care to individuals.

In 2003, the Human Genome Project culminated in the successful sequencing of the more than 3 billion base pairs making up a single human genome, costing an international consortium of researchers 13 years and $3 billion to complete.

Today, similar sequencing can happen in weeks for about $4,000. But soon, science will realize the hallowed “$1,000 genome,” – the symbolic marker of entry into the era of personalized medicine, in which people have their DNA sequenced to help tailor medical care to their specific needs.

Last modified Thu, 20 Nov, 2014 at 10:52

Stanford engineers develop tiny, sound-powered chip to serve as medical device

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Using ultrasound to deliver power wirelessly, Stanford researchers are working on a new generation of medical devices that would be planted deep inside the body to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain.

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Sound-powered Medical Implant
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Stanford engineers develop tiny, sound-powered medical implant to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain.

Medical researchers would like to plant tiny electronic devices deep inside our bodies to monitor biological processes and deliver pinpoint therapies to treat illness or relieve pain.

But so far engineers have been unable to make such devices small and useful enough. Providing electric power to medical implants has been one stumbling block. Using wires or batteries to deliver power tends to make implants too big, too clumsy – or both.

Last modified Thu, 16 Oct, 2014 at 8:43

Stanford engineers developing miniature wireless device to create better way of studying chronic pain

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A team of Stanford engineers is creating a small wireless device that will improve studies of chronic pain. The engineers hope to use what they learn to develop better therapies for the condition, which costs the economy $600 billion a year.

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Wireless device to study pain
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Stanford engineers are creating a small wireless device to improve studies of chronic pain

Ada Poon, a Stanford assistant professor of electrical engineering, is a master at building minuscule wireless devices that function in the body and can be powered remotely. Now, she and collaborators in bioengineering and anesthesia want to leverage this technology to develop a way of studying – and eventually developing treatments for – pain.

Last modified Wed, 8 Oct, 2014 at 12:59