Materials Science and Engineering

MEET THE MAKERS Winter 2016 Student Showcase

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9:30 am
Wednesday, March 16, 2016
The Atrium, Peterson Building 550, Stanford  Map

 

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, March 16, 2016. 9:30 am - 11:30 am
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Thu, 11 Feb, 2016 at 15:33

Open Garage Talk - Mindset of a Champion

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Reception at 5 pm, discussion at 6 pm
Wednesday, February 10
 Automotive Innovation Facility, Stanford  Map
     

Registration required; seating is limited

 

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, February 10, 2016. 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Location: 
Automotive Innovation Facility, Stanford
Admission: 
Free with registration, open to the public

Last modified Fri, 5 Feb, 2016 at 16:30

Meet "Hedgehog": Your tour guide to asteroids, comets and other things that whirl around the solar system

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Type: 
Research News

A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

Slug: 
Robotic space hedgehog will hop, flip and spin to explore asteroids.
Short Dek: 
A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

Your best guess is that the landscape is as inhospitable as it gets: an irregular range of sharp boulders and loose rubble piles strewn among jagged crevasses and deep troughs of dust. But then again, it’s just a guess because no one’s ever actually seen this landscape up close. Now imagine that you need to send a robot across that landscape, from a perch at the lip of a steep crater to the edge of an ice-encrusted hole 1,000 meters away. And imagine that gravity is a tiny fraction of what we have on Earth.

Last modified Fri, 5 Feb, 2016 at 9:51

A group of scholars look to early 20th century radio technology to help improve Internet security

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Type: 
Research News

A new study shows how harnessing the quantum properties of light can create a transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping.

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Scholars look to radio for Internet security
Short Dek: 
Study shows properties of light can create transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping

Imagine communicating with your bank, the IRS or your doctor by way of an Internet that was perfectly secure. Your most private data would be protected with absolute certainty and, better yet, if any bad actor were to try to eavesdrop you would know immediately. Such is the promise of secure quantum communication. 

Last modified Tue, 2 Feb, 2016 at 9:14

Water-Energy Nexus with New Materials Technology - Yi Cui

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Precourt Institute for Energy, Seminar Series

04:30 PM - 05:20 pm, Monday, February 29, 2016

Nvidia Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center

Free and Open to All

 

Date/Time: 
Monday, February 29, 2016. 4:30 pm - 6:20 pm
Location: 
Nvidia Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Mon, 11 Jan, 2016 at 17:04

Oleg D. Sherby, professor of materials science and engineering, dies at 90

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Type: 
Research News

Hailed for the discovery of superplastic steel, Sherby was a professor at Stanford for 30 years. He was known on campus for his affable manner and for organizing volleyball matches and poker games.

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Oleg Sherby, materials science professor, dies at 90
Short Dek: 
Oleg Sherby, materials science professor emeritus who discovered superplastic steel dies at age 90

Oleg Dimitri Sherby, a professor emeritus at Stanford best known for his discovery of superplastic steel, died Nov. 9 at his home in Menlo Park. He was 90 years old.

Last modified Wed, 13 Jan, 2016 at 11:24

New Stanford battery shuts down at high temperatures and restarts when it cools

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Type: 
Research News

Stanford researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that turns on and off depending on the temperature. The new technology could prevent battery fires that have plagued laptops, hoverboards and other electronic devices.

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Lithium-ion battery shuts down before overheating
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Researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that could prevent battery fires

Stanford researchers have developed the first lithium-ion battery that shuts down before overheating, then restarts immediately when the temperature cools.

Last modified Wed, 3 Feb, 2016 at 8:09

New Stanford research reveals the secrets of stishovites, a rare form of crystallized sand

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Type: 
Research News

Lasers are nothing like meteor strikes, but in the nanosecond when each strike silicon dioxide, the main ingredient in coastal sand, stishovites form. Understanding how this rare crystal form will help improve laser technology and allow Earth scientists to better understand meteor impacts.

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Understanding stishovite crystals will help improve laser technology
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Understanding how stishovite crystals form will help improve laser technology

An asteroid smashing into the earth and a laser pulsing through optical glass are very different phenomena, but both produce the extreme heat and pressures that instantaneously fuse silicon dioxide – the compound found in sand and glass -- into the hard, dense and rare crystal known as stishovite.

Named after Sergey M. Stishov, the Russian physicist who first synthesized it in 1961, stishovite means different things to different scientists.

To geologists, stishovite provides residual proof of a meteor impact.

Last modified Thu, 10 Dec, 2015 at 16:25

Stanford engineers develop 'invisible wires' that could improve solar cell efficiency

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Type: 
Research News

Stanford engineers have discovered how to make the electrical wiring on top of solar cells nearly invisible to incoming light. The new design, which uses silicon nanopillars to hide the wires, could dramatically boost solar-cell efficiency.

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Stanford engineers develop 'invisible wires' that could improve solar cell efficiency
Short Dek: 
Design uses silicon nanopillars to hide wires

A solar cell is basically a semiconductor, which converts sunlight into electricity, sandwiched between metal contacts that carry the electrical current.  

But this widely used design has a flaw: The critical but shiny metal on top of the cell reflects sunlight away from the semiconductor where electricity is produced, reducing the cell's efficiency.

Last modified Thu, 3 Dec, 2015 at 13:25