Materials Science and Engineering

Stanford engineers make flexible carbon nanotube circuits more reliable and efficient

Print view
Type: 
Research News

Researchers invent a process to 'dope' carbon filaments with an additive to improve their electronic performance, paving the way for digital devices that bend.

Slug: 
Improving Flexible Carbon Nanotubes
Short Dek: 
Stanford engineers make flexible carbon nanotube circuits more reliable and efficient.

Engineers would love to create flexible electronic devices, such as e-readers that could be folded to fit into a pocket. One approach involves designing circuits based on electronic fibers known as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) instead of rigid silicon chips.

But reliability is essential. Most silicon chips are based on a type of circuit design that allows them to function flawlessly even when the device experiences power fluctuations. However, it is much more challenging to do so with CNT circuits.

Last modified Tue, 18 Mar, 2014 at 15:28

New ‘pomegranate-inspired’ design solves problems for lithium-ion batteries

Print view
Type: 
Research News

Clustering silicon nanoparticles overcomes several remaining obstacles to using silicon for a new generation of lithium-ion batteries, researchers say.

Slug: 
Battery Design Inspired by Fruit
Short Dek: 
Clustering Nanoparticles overcomes obstacles to using silicon.

An electrode designed like a pomegranate – with silicon nanoparticles clustered like seeds in a tough carbon rind – overcomes several remaining obstacles to using silicon for a new generation of lithium-ion batteries, say its inventors at Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Last modified Tue, 18 Feb, 2014 at 11:36

President Obama selects two Stanford engineers for early career award

Print view
Type: 
Research News

Sigrid Close, an assistant professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Jennifer Dionne, an assistant professor of Materials Science and Engineering, will receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

Slug: 
Stanford Engineers Honored
Short Dek: 
Sigrid Close and Jennifer Dionne will receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

Sigrid Close, an assistant professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, is among 19 National Science Foundation-funded researchers to receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the U.S. government’s highest honor for scientists and engineers early in their independent research careers.

Last modified Fri, 10 Jan, 2014 at 12:17

Letter from the Dean

Print view
Type: 
Announcement

Stanford engineers have always tackled the biggest challenges, and the past academic year was no exception.

Slug: 
New Directions

Stanford Engineering Dean Jim Plummer

Last modified Wed, 18 Dec, 2013 at 11:35

Stanford Engineering Year in Review

Print view
Type: 
Press Release

Stanford engineers are driven to change the world, and 2013 was no exception. Stanford Engineering faculty and students blazed new trails in energy, nanotechnology, bioengineering, education and many other fields.

Slug: 
New Directions
Short Dek: 
Stanford engineers tackled some of the world's biggest challenges during the past academic year.

 

The Stanford School of Engineering has been at the forefront of innovation for nearly a century, turning big ideas into solutions that have improved people’s lives across the globe. Our mission is to seek solutions to important global problems and educate leaders who will make the world a better place by using the power of engineering principles, techniques and systems. 

Last modified Thu, 13 Mar, 2014 at 15:24

Study to assess how heat and moisture will affect the lifespan of utility-scale photovoltaic arrays

Print view
Type: 
Research News

Three-year, $1.165 million award to Professor Reinhold Dauskardt is part of the Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative to make solar fully competitive with traditional energy sources by 2020.

Slug: 
Studying Lifespan Of Solar Arrays
Short Dek: 
Professor Reinhold Dauskardt will examine how heat and moisture affect utility-scale photovoltaic arrays.

 

The Department of Energy has awarded Professor Reinhold Dauskardt $1.165 million to study how factors such as heat fluctuations and moisture changes will affect the photovoltaic arrays that utility companies would use to build large scale solar power plants.

Last modified Mon, 25 Nov, 2013 at 17:05

Stanford Engineering Hero William J. Perry looks ahead to North American energy independence and back at a career In national defense

Print view
Type: 
Research Profile

A professor emeritus of Management Science and Engineering, Perry has advised presidents, served as Secretary of Defense and dismantled nuclear weapons

Slug: 
William Perry Engineering Hero
Short Dek: 
Stanford Engineering Hero William J. Perry looks ahead to North American energy independence and back at a career In national defense

 

William J. Perry has been an entrepreneur, soldier, professor, businessman and national leader. Now he is a hero as well.

Perry, former U.S. secretary of defense, is the latest person to be inducted as a Stanford Engineering Hero, joining a select group of Stanford alumni or former faculty whose life work has profoundly advanced the course of human, social and economic progress.

Heroes are selected annually by a panel of distinguished subject-matter experts and technology historians.

Last modified Fri, 22 Nov, 2013 at 12:37

Stanford study could lead to paradigm shift in organic solar cell research

Print view
Type: 
Research News

A new study by Stanford scientists overturns a widely held explanation for how organic photovoltaics turn sunlight into electricity.

Slug: 
Reassessing Organic Photovoltaics
Short Dek: 
Stanford study could lead to paradigm shift in organic solar cell research.

Organic solar cells have long been touted as lightweight, low-cost alternatives to rigid solar panels made of silicon. Dramatic improvements in the efficiency of organic photovoltaics have been made in recent years, yet the fundamental question of how these devices convert sunlight into electricity is still hotly debated.

Last modified Wed, 20 Nov, 2013 at 14:23

Stanford and SLAC scientists invent self-healing battery electrode

Print view
Type: 
Research News

A team of Stanford and SLAC scientists has made the first battery electrode that heals itself, opening a potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices.

Slug: 
Self-Healing Battery Electrode
Short Dek: 
Stanford and SLAC scientists' invention holds potential for the next generation of lithium ion batteries.

Researchers have made the first battery electrode that heals itself, opening a new and potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices.

The secret is a stretchy polymer that coats the electrode, binds it and spontaneously heals tiny cracks that develop during battery operation, said the team from Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

They reported the advance in the Nov. 19 issue of Nature Chemistry.

Last modified Mon, 18 Nov, 2013 at 11:29

Stanford faculty awarded $2.2 million for innovative energy research

Print view
Type: 
Research News

Stanford's Precourt Institute, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center have awarded 11 seed grants to Stanford faculty for early-stage energy research.

Slug: 
Grants for new energy research
Short Dek: 
Engineering faculty to pursue clean tech, energy efficiency.

Stanford University's Precourt Institute for Energy, the Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy have awarded 11 seed grants totaling $2.2 million for promising new research in clean technology and energy efficiency.

Last modified Thu, 31 Oct, 2013 at 9:57