Materials Science and Engineering

Stanford engineers' new manufacturing process could yield better solar cells, faster chips

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Research News

Silicon isn't the only chip-making material under the sun, just the cheapest. But a new process could make the alternative material, gallium arsenide, more cost effective.

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New Process for Making Semiconductors
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Stanford engineers' method could make the alternative to silicon cheaper to use.

Stanford Professor Bruce Clemens

Computer chips, solar cells and other electronic devices have traditionally been based on silicon, the most famous of the semiconductors, that special class of materials whose unique electronic properties can be manipulated to turn electricity on and off the way faucets control the flow of water.

Last modified Tue, 24 Mar, 2015 at 14:09

HCI Design Studio final presentations

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Friday, March 13, 2015
Cubberly Auditorium, Stanford  Map
Free and open to the public, refreshments

 

Date/Time: 
Friday, March 13, 2015. 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Location: 
Cubberly Auditorium, Stanford

Last modified Thu, 5 Mar, 2015 at 14:56

Bruce Clemens elected fellow of Materials Research Society

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Professor of materials science and engineering is honored for pioneering work in thin-film and nanostructured material growth and characterization, leadership service to the society and the materials community, and for leadership in teaching and mentoring.

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Bruce Clemens Elected MRS Fellow
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Materials Research Society honors professor of materials science and engineering.

 

Last modified Mon, 2 Mar, 2015 at 12:42

Jennfier Dionne, Percy Liang elected Sloan Research Fellows

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Research News

Members of Stanford Engineering faculty honored as next generation of scientific leaders.

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Dionne, Liang Elected Sloan Fellows
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Stanford engineers honored as next generation of scientific leaders.

 

Jennifer Dionne, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, and Percy Liang, assistant professor of computer science, have been selected as 2015 Sloan Research Fellows.

Last modified Thu, 26 Feb, 2015 at 15:07

Stanford engineers develop new air filter that could help Beijing residents breathe easily

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Research News

Associate Professor Yi Cui and his students have turned a material commonly used in surgical gloves into a low-cost, highly efficient air filter. It could be used to improve facemasks and window screens, and maybe even scrub the exhaust from power plants.

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Stanford Engineers' better air filter
Short Dek: 
Yi Cui and his students have turned a material commonly used in surgical gloves into a low-cost, highly efficient air filter.

In the past few years, Yi Cui has made several business trips to China. Each time he has found himself choked by smog produced by automobiles and coal power plants.

After a few of these trips, Cui, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford, came up with an idea to clean the pollution. He and his graduate students set to work designing an inexpensive, efficient air filter that could ease the breathing for people in polluted cities.

Last modified Thu, 19 Feb, 2015 at 10:45

Inexpensive material could be the key to cheaper, more efficient solar cells

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Research News

Putting a film of the crystalline material perovskite on top of a silicon solar cell increases the cell's efficiency nearly 50 percent, Stanford engineers say.

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Inexpensive Material Boosts Solar Cells
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Putting a film of perovskite on top of a silicon solar cell increases efficiency nearly 50 percent, Stanford engineers say.

Stacking perovskites, a crystalline material, onto a conventional silicon solar cell dramatically improves the overall efficiency of the cell, according to a new study led by Stanford engineers.

The researchers describe their novel perovskite-silicon solar cell in the journal Energy & Environmental Science.

Last modified Thu, 29 Jan, 2015 at 12:37

Stanford engineers use brilliant X-rays to illuminate catalysis, revise theories

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Research Profile

Using high-brilliance X-rays in a new way, Stanford engineers observed electrons at work during catalytic reactions. Their findings challenge long-held theories about some catalysts, opening the door to new or improved renewable energy applications.

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Brilliant X-rays Illuminate Catalysis
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Stanford engineers' findings challenge long-held theories about some catalysts.

Many of today's most promising renewable energy technologies – fuel cells, water splitters and artificial photosynthesis – rely on catalysts to expedite the chemical reactions at the heart of their potential. Catalysts are materials that enhance chemical reactions without being consumed in the process. For more than a century, engineers across the world have engaged in a near-continual search for ways to improve catalysts for their devices and processes.

Last modified Tue, 20 Jan, 2015 at 12:40

Stanford faculty awarded seed grants for innovative energy research

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Research News

Stanford's Precourt Institute, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center have awarded eight seed grants to Stanford faculty for early-stage energy research.

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Seed Grants for Energy Research
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Eight grants awarded to Stanford faculty for early-stage energy research.

Stanford University's Precourt Institute for Energy, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy have awarded eight seed grants totaling about $1.5 million for promising new research in clean technology and energy efficiency.

Last modified Thu, 18 Dec, 2014 at 11:01

Stanford team wins international award for experimental blood test device that uses a smart phone

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Research News

Four students and two faculty advisors create portable device that can detect hepatitis B infections in minutes to win one of five awards in the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE, a global competition to improve diagnostic devices.

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Stanford Team Wins at XCHALLENGE
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Experimental blood test device that uses a smart phone wins one of five awards at a global competition to improve diagnostic devices.

A team of Stanford University students and faculty has been selected as one of five Distinguished Award Prize winners in the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE, a global competition to catalyze breakthrough medical sensing technologies that will ultimately enable faster diagnoses and easier personal health monitoring.

The Stanford team was recognized for developing a hepatitis B blood test that can be analyzed in minutes using the microprocessor in a smart phone.

Last modified Fri, 6 Feb, 2015 at 16:21

Stanford scientists create a 'smart' lithium-ion battery that warns of potential fire hazards

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Stanford's Yi Cui and colleagues have created a lithium-ion battery that alerts users to potential overheating and fire.

Slug: 
Battery Warns of Fire Hazards
Short Dek: 
Stanford's Yi Cui and colleagues have created a lithium-ion battery that alerts users to potential overheating.

Stanford University scientists have developed a "smart" lithium-ion battery that gives ample warning before it overheats and bursts into flames.

The new technology is designed for conventional lithium-ion batteries now used in billions of cellphones, laptops and other electronic devices, as well as a growing number of cars and airplanes.

Last modified Mon, 13 Oct, 2014 at 12:21