Materials Science and Engineering

Single-catalyst water splitter from Stanford produces clean-burning hydrogen 24/7

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Type: 
Research News

Stanford scientists have developed a cheap and efficient way to extract clean-burning hydrogen fuel from water 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Slug: 
Low-Cost Water Splitter
Short Dek: 
Stanford scientists have developed a cheap and efficient way to extract clean-burning hydrogen fuel from water.

Stanford University scientists have invented a low-cost water splitter that uses a single catalyst to produce both hydrogen and oxygen gas 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The device, described in a study published June 23 in Nature Communications, could provide a renewable source of clean-burning hydrogen fuel for transportation and industry.

Last modified Tue, 23 Jun, 2015 at 10:55

Entrepreneurial success depends on actions, attitudes and practice, Stanford expert says

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Research News

Professor Tina Seelig says entrepreneurship can be taught, learned and practiced through a rigorous approach that she calls the Invention Cycle.

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Keys to Entrepreneurial Success
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Entrepreneurship can be taught, learned and practiced through a rigorous approach that Professor Tina Seelig calls the Invention Cycle.

Tina Seelig, director of Stanford Technology Ventures ProgramWith the right set of tools and techniques, people can gain the necessary skills to achieve entrepreneurial success, a Stanford innovation expert says.

Last modified Wed, 27 May, 2015 at 10:24

The Art of Science Competition - Exhibition

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Packard Atrium, Stanford University
4 - 6 pm

 

The Art of Science Competition is a campus wide event to celebrate the aesthetic beauty of science. Last year we received over 80 submissions  representing more than 20 department across the university, encompassing the schools of Medicine, Earth, Energy, & Environmental Sciences, Humanities and Sciences, and Engineering.

Date/Time: 
Friday, May 29, 2015. 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Location: 
Packard Building, Atrium, Stanford
Sponsors: 
Stanford Materials Research Society, IEEE
Contact Info: 
StanfordMRS.AO@gmail.com
Admission: 
Free, Open to the public

Last modified Fri, 22 May, 2015 at 14:18

Nicholas Melosh wins Cal-BRAIN grant for neuroengineering research

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Type: 
Research News

The associate professor of materials science and engineering is working to refine the electrodes neuroscientists use to record the activity of single neurons.

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Melosh Wins Cal-BRAIN Grant
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Associate professor is working to refine the electrodes neuroscientists use to record the activity of single neurons.

Two Stanford University faculty members developing techniques for monitoring neurons as they fire signals throughout the brain got a boost in the first round of funding by California’s neuroscience research grants program, Cal-BRAIN.

Both projects could help neuroscientists better understand how the brain learns and remembers, or probe what goes awry in mental health conditions, neurodegenerative diseases and other conditions.

Last modified Thu, 7 May, 2015 at 14:58

Stanford engineers devise optical method for producing high-res, 3-D images of nanoscale objects

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Research News

The technique, called cathodoluminescence tomography, could assist in the development of high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, or improve the way biological systems are visualized.

Slug: 
New method for 3-D images of nanoscale objects
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The technique could assist in the development of high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs.

To design the next generation of optical devices, ranging from efficient solar panels to LEDs to optical transistors, engineers will need a 3-dimensional image depicting how light interacts with these objects on the nanoscale.

Unfortunately, the physics of light has thrown up a roadblock in traditional imaging techniques: the smaller the object, the lower the image's resolution in 3-D.

Last modified Tue, 28 Apr, 2015 at 14:05

Stanford engineers' new manufacturing process could yield better solar cells, faster chips

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Research News

Silicon isn't the only chip-making material under the sun, just the cheapest. But a new process could make the alternative material, gallium arsenide, more cost effective.

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New Process for Making Semiconductors
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Stanford engineers' method could make the alternative to silicon cheaper to use.

Stanford Professor Bruce Clemens

Computer chips, solar cells and other electronic devices have traditionally been based on silicon, the most famous of the semiconductors, that special class of materials whose unique electronic properties can be manipulated to turn electricity on and off the way faucets control the flow of water.

Last modified Tue, 24 Mar, 2015 at 14:09

HCI Design Studio final presentations

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Friday, March 13, 2015
Cubberly Auditorium, Stanford  Map
Free and open to the public, refreshments

 

Date/Time: 
Friday, March 13, 2015. 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Location: 
Cubberly Auditorium, Stanford

Last modified Thu, 5 Mar, 2015 at 14:56

Bruce Clemens elected fellow of Materials Research Society

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Research News

Professor of materials science and engineering is honored for pioneering work in thin-film and nanostructured material growth and characterization, leadership service to the society and the materials community, and for leadership in teaching and mentoring.

Slug: 
Bruce Clemens Elected MRS Fellow
Short Dek: 
Materials Research Society honors professor of materials science and engineering.

 

Last modified Mon, 2 Mar, 2015 at 12:42

Jennfier Dionne, Percy Liang elected Sloan Research Fellows

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Research News

Members of Stanford Engineering faculty honored as next generation of scientific leaders.

Slug: 
Dionne, Liang Elected Sloan Fellows
Short Dek: 
Stanford engineers honored as next generation of scientific leaders.

 

Jennifer Dionne, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, and Percy Liang, assistant professor of computer science, have been selected as 2015 Sloan Research Fellows.

Last modified Thu, 26 Feb, 2015 at 15:07

Stanford engineers develop new air filter that could help Beijing residents breathe easily

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Type: 
Research News

Associate Professor Yi Cui and his students have turned a material commonly used in surgical gloves into a low-cost, highly efficient air filter. It could be used to improve facemasks and window screens, and maybe even scrub the exhaust from power plants.

Slug: 
Stanford Engineers' better air filter
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Yi Cui and his students have turned a material commonly used in surgical gloves into a low-cost, highly efficient air filter.

In the past few years, Yi Cui has made several business trips to China. Each time he has found himself choked by smog produced by automobiles and coal power plants.

After a few of these trips, Cui, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford, came up with an idea to clean the pollution. He and his graduate students set to work designing an inexpensive, efficient air filter that could ease the breathing for people in polluted cities.

Last modified Thu, 19 Feb, 2015 at 10:45