Mechanical Engineering

Kenneth Goodson receives Semiconductor Research Corporation’s Technical Excellence Award

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Research News

The award recognizes Goodson’s work studying heat transfer in electronic nanostructures and packaging, microfluidic heat sinks, and thermoelectric and photonic energy conversion devices.

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SRC Honors Kenneth Goodson
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Semiconductor Research Corporation’s Technical Excellence Award recognizes work studying heat transfer.

Kenneth Goodson, the Bosch Mechanical Engineering Department Chairman and Davies Family Provostial Professor, has received the Semiconductor Research Corporation’s Technical Excellence Award for his work studying heat transfer in electronic nanostructures and packaging, microfluidic heat sinks, and thermoelectric and photonic energy conversion devices.

Last modified Thu, 11 Sep, 2014 at 10:15

Hummingbirds vs. helicopters: Stanford engineers compare flight dynamics

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Research News

A quantitative analysis of hummingbird wings shows that they generate lift more efficiently than the best microhelicopter blades. The findings could lead to more powerful, bird-inspired robotic vehicles.

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Hummingbirds vs. Helicopters
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Stanford engineers show that hummingbird wings generate lift more efficiently than the best microhelicopter blades.

More than 42 million years of natural selection have turned hummingbirds into some of the world's most energetically efficient flyers, particularly when it comes to hovering in place.

Humans, however, are gaining ground quickly. A new study led by David Lentink, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford, reveals that the spinning blades of microhelicopters are about as efficient at hovering as the average hummingbird.

Last modified Wed, 30 Jul, 2014 at 11:37

Stanford students learn to build their own bikes

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Research News

One of the most popular courses run by the Product Realization Lab, ME 204 teaches students how to build bicycles, but also patience and project management.

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Students Engineer Their Own Bikes
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In Product Realization Lab, Stanford students learn more than just how to build a bicycle.

In the summer of 2001, Ryan Connolly wanted to build a bicycle from scratch. Connolly, a master's student majoring in manufacturing systems engineering, had met a master frame builder in Palo Alto and convinced him to come to the Product Realization Lab (PRL) and share his knowledge.

That fall quarter, Connolly learned to design and build a frame and fork. In the winter quarter, he built all of the necessary tools, jigs and fixtures required to build not just a single frame, but many.

Last modified Thu, 17 Jul, 2014 at 14:54

Professor Kenneth Goodson receives ASME’s 2014 Heat Transfer Memorial Award

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Research News

The award recognizes contributions to the science and technology of phonon and electron transport and scattering in films and nanostructures.

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ASME honors Kenneth Goodson
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Chairman of Mechanical Engineering Department receives 2014 Heat Transfer Memorial Award.

Kenneth Goodson, the Bosch Mechanical Engineering Department Chairman and Davies Family Provostial Professor, has been awarded ASME’s 2014 Heat Transfer Memorial Award in the science category.

Last modified Fri, 20 Jun, 2014 at 10:06

Stanford Engineer Named a National Geographic Emerging Explorer

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Research News

Xiaolin Zheng’s work developing peel-and-stick solar panels earns her a spot in 2014 class of young innovators.

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National Geographic Honors Zheng
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Assistant Professor Xiaolin Zheng is named a National Geographic Emerging Explorer.

Xiaolin Zheng, an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering, has been named to the 2014 class of National Geographic Emerging Explorers for her work developing “solar stickers,” flexible, decal-like solar panels that can be peeled off like Band-Aids and stuck to virtually any surface.

Last modified Fri, 16 May, 2014 at 16:49

Animatronic design challenge takes to the water

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Research News

Stanford mechanical engineering students demonstrate their autonomous, battery-powered waterfowl.

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Animatronic Design Takes to the Water
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Engineering students demonstrate their self-propelled waterfowl.

If it paddles like a duck, glides like a duck and moves its head, wings or tail feathers like a duck, it must be an entry in Stanford Engineering’s duck-amatronics event.

Last modified Tue, 13 May, 2014 at 9:56

Mechanical engineer helps eye doctors turn smart phone into diagnostic tool

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Research News

In this interdisciplinary project, graduate student Alexandre Jais turned out quick prototypes on his 3D printer at home.

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Field Tool for Eye Exams
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Engineer collaborates with opthamologists to turn smart phone into diagnostic tool.

Stanford engineers love to solve real world problems, and one recent example of this arises from a story about how researchers at Stanford Medical School turned a smartphone into an inexpensive tool for doing eye examinations in the field.

Last modified Tue, 13 May, 2014 at 10:53

Stanford engineers brave the 'vomit comet' to improve astronauts' heart health

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Research Profile

When humans go into space, the reduced gravity can weaken the heart's ability to pump hard in response to a crisis. Stanford student researchers are developing a simple device to monitor an astronaut's heart function, and have flown in near-zero gravity to show that it works.

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Astronaut Heart Health
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Device measures heart function in near-zero gravity.

The human heart was not meant to pump in space.

Early astronauts in the Apollo program performed every conceivable physical test to ensure that they were each at the pinnacle of human fitness. And yet, when they returned to Earth after just a few days in space, they felt dizzy when standing and tests showed that each beat of their heart pumped less blood than it had before the mission.

Last modified Tue, 13 May, 2014 at 10:55

Scaling Products in Low-Income Markets

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Scaling Products in Low-Income Markets

March 6, 2014

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Wallenberg Theater, Wallenberg Hall

Open to the public, No RSVP required

 

 

 

Krista Donaldson - CEO at D-Rev

 

Abstract:

Date/Time: 
Thursday, March 6, 2014. 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Location: 
Wallenberg Theater, Wallenberg Hall, 450 Serra Mall, Building 160, Stanford
Sponsors: 
CDDRL, Liberation Technology Seminar Series
Contact Info: 
Kathleen Barcos, (650) 724-5555, kbarcos@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free

Last modified Fri, 28 Feb, 2014 at 12:10

Shedding a light on pain: A technique developed by Stanford bioengineers could lead to new treatments

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Research Profile

Stanford researchers have developed mice whose sensitivity to pain can be dialed up or down by shining light on their paws. The research could help scientists understand and eventually treat chronic pain in humans.

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Shedding Light on Pain
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A technique developed by Stanford scientists could lead to new treatments.

The mice in Scott Delp's lab, unlike their human counterparts, can get pain relief from the glow of a yellow light.

Last modified Wed, 26 Feb, 2014 at 10:00