Mechanical Engineering

Studying a 'Silly Putty' protein could spur efforts to repair damaged human tissues

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Type: 
Research News

New insights into collagen, the stretchy protein that provides a stiff cushion for cells, aids our understanding of regenerative medicine.

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Studying a 'Silly Putty' protein could spur efforts to repair damaged human tissues
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New insights into collagen, the stretchy protein that provides a stiff cushion for cells, aids our understanding of regenerative medicine.


Stanford researchers are studying the way collagen moves between stiff and elastic states in the human body. | Image by Sebastian Kaulitzki/Shutterstock

Last modified Wed, 4 May, 2016 at 10:35

Where Imperfections Lead to Opportunity: Defect-Based Devices in Diamond and SiC

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Stanford University Department of Mechanical Engineering William C. Reynolds Memorial Seminar

Presented by Dr. Evelyn Hu Tarr-Coyne Professor of Applied Physics and of Electrical Engineering John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Harvard University

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016. 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Location: 
Huang 300 - Mackenzie Room

Last modified Tue, 3 May, 2016 at 13:47

​The maiden voyage of a humanoid robotic diver recovers treasures from King Louis XIV’s wrecked flagship

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Research News

Powered by artificial intelligence and haptic feedback systems, the robot OceanOne gives human pilots an unprecedented ability to explore the ocean depths. ​

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​The maiden voyage of a humanoid robotic diver recovers treasures from King Louis XIV’s wrecked flagship
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Powered by artificial intelligence and haptic feedback systems, the robot OceanOne gives human pilots an unprecedented ability to explore the ocean depths. ​

OceanOne, a new humanoid robotic diver from Stanford, explores La Lune, a 17th century shipwreck off the southern coast of France. | Image courtesy Frederic Osada and Teddy Seguin/DRASSM 

Last modified Wed, 27 Apr, 2016 at 12:15

A one-of-a-kind wind tunnel for birds paves the way for better drones

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Research News

An engineer explores how the magic of bird flight can be applied to building better aerial robots.

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A one-of-a-kind wind tunnel for birds paves the way for better drones
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An engineer explores how the magic of bird flight can be applied to building better aerial robots.

Ferrari, a lovebird, with Stanford's David Lentink, who is using a wind tunnel to probe the mysteries of birds in flight. | Photo by L.A. Cicero

Last modified Fri, 22 Apr, 2016 at 15:46

​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin

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Research News

A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

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​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin
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A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

Can we build better prostheses? | REUTERS/Mary Schwalm

Last modified Fri, 22 Apr, 2016 at 13:57

​John Hennessy: Great leadership can be learned

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Research News

Stanford University President John Hennessy offers his take on important leadership qualities, Silicon Valley, and the future of higher education.​

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​John Hennessy: Great leadership can be learned
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Stanford University President John Hennessy offers his take on important leadership qualities, Silicon Valley, and the future of higher education.​

Stanford University President John Hennessy discusses some of the most powerful lessons he’s learned as leader of one of the world’s most complex and dynamic institutions of higher education. In conversation with Tina Seelig, director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, at the DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series, Hennessy also shares insights from his entrepreneurial career in the high-tech industry.

Last modified Wed, 13 Apr, 2016 at 11:44

Meet the Makers

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Research News

In the Stanford Product Realization Lab, students get back in touch with the process of making and building things.

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Meet the Makers
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In the Stanford Product Realization Lab, students get back in touch with the process of making and building things.

Photos courtesy of Tamer Shabani

Each quarter, mechanical engineering’s Stanford Product Realization Lab hosts an event to allow students to showcase projects they designed and manufactured in the foundry, the woodworking lab, the welding lab, or the machining lab. We sat down with seven students to hear more about their Winter 2016 projects.

Last modified Wed, 4 May, 2016 at 8:37

Ford Motor Company CEO: To innovate, one must challenge customs and question traditions

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Research News

Mark Fields discusses the evolution of the auto industry, and how the business he leads is moving from an auto company to an auto and mobility company.

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Ford Motor Company CEO: To innovate, one must challenge customs and question traditions
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Mark Fields discusses the evolution of the auto industry, and how the business he leads is moving from an auto company to an auto and mobility company.

Ford’s Mark Fields, in Detroit | Reuters/Mark Blinch

Last modified Fri, 18 Mar, 2016 at 11:20

Musical training gives Stanford engineers a creative lift

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Research News

A fellowship offered jointly by the School of Engineering and the Friends of Music at Stanford provides music lessons to engineering students.

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Musical training gives Stanford engineers a creative lift
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A fellowship offered jointly by the School of Engineering and the Friends of Music at Stanford provides music lessons to engineering students.

Stanford engineers can get scholarships to study music and other arts.  | REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak

Last modified Wed, 16 Mar, 2016 at 9:36

Lessons in leadership from a 92-year-old product designer

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Research News

Barbara Beskind discusses the importance of observing, listening, trusting, and learning from mistakes

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Lessons in leadership from a 92-year-old product designer
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Barbara Beskind discusses the importance of observing, listening, trusting, and learning from mistakes

Barbara Beskind | Courtesy IDEO

Last modified Mon, 14 Mar, 2016 at 15:48