Electronics and Photonics

Your phone may reveal more about you than you think

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Research News

In work that could help inform policies for government surveillance and consumer data privacy, researchers show that telephone metadata can reveal a surprising amount of personal detail.

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Your phone may reveal more about you than you think
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In work that could help inform policies for government surveillance and consumer data privacy, researchers show that telephone metadata can reveal a surprising amount of personal detail.

Warrantless surveillance can reveal a surprising amount of personal information about individual Americans | REUTERS/Albert Gea

Most people might not give telephone metadata – the numbers you dial, the length of your calls – a second thought. Some government officials probably view it as similarly trivial, which is why this information can be obtained without a warrant.

Last modified Wed, 18 May, 2016 at 11:11

​Stanford engineer Bradford Parkinson, the 'Father of GPS,' wins the prestigious Marconi Prize

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Research News

​The Marconi Prize is awarded each year to recognize major advances in the communications field that benefit humanity.

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​Stanford engineer Bradford Parkinson, the 'Father of GPS,' wins the prestigious Marconi Prize
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​The Marconi Prize is awarded each year to recognize major advances in the communications field that benefit humanity.

Aero/Astro Professor Emeritus Brad Parkinson | Photo courtesy of Bradford Parkinson

       

It is difficult to imagine that 50 years ago, practically no one wanted to fund the development of a Global Positioning System (GPS). Not only were governments uninterested in funding such a project, they didn’t consider it useful.

Last modified Tue, 17 May, 2016 at 10:25

Imagine a “cool” data-storage technology that’s just a few atoms thick

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Research Profile

An experimental semiconductor material could store data in a new way that minimizes the generation of heat.

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Imagine a “cool” data-storage technology that’s just a few atoms thick
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An experimental semiconductor material could store data in a new way that minimizes the generation of heat.

Potential for a new way to store data | iStock/ilbusca & iStock Matej Moderc

Last modified Wed, 4 May, 2016 at 11:26

​Yi Cui: How nano materials can help improve everything from batteries to face masks

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Research News

By focusing on structures that are infinitesimally small, a prolific engineer initiates a series of very big things.

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​Yi Cui: How nano materials can help improve everything from batteries to face masks
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By focusing on structures that are infinitesimally small, a prolific engineer initiates a series of very big things.

Yi Cui | Photo by Matt Beardsley/SLAC

           

What do a battery, a facemask and a solar cell have in common?

Last modified Wed, 4 May, 2016 at 8:36

How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage

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Research News

A team of engineers obtain a first look inside phase-changing nanoparticles and find that their structure significantly influences performance.

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How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage
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A team of engineers obtain a first look inside phase-changing nanoparticles and find that their structure significantly influences performance.

Stanford engineers studying the structures of phase-changing nanoparticles have found that shape matters. Materials composed of cubes and pyramids, for instance, may yield more efficient batteries than those made of icosahedrons which are 20-sided polyhedrons. | Image courtesy Dionne Group

Last modified Tue, 26 Apr, 2016 at 12:11

​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin

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Research News

A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

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​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin
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A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

Can we build better prostheses? | REUTERS/Mary Schwalm

Last modified Fri, 22 Apr, 2016 at 13:57

How could we use the tiniest specs of diamonds?

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Research News

Extracting nanodiamonds from crude oil could help produce next-generation tools for imaging and communications.

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How could we use the tiniest specs of diamonds?
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Extracting nanodiamonds from crude oil could help to produce next-generation tools for imaging and communications.

Too small to see with the naked eye, diamondoids are visible only when they clump together in fine, sugar-like crystals like these. | Photo by Christopher Smith, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Last modified Mon, 11 Apr, 2016 at 8:20

Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water?

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Research News

Hydrogen powered vehicles offer a clean alternative to running cars with fossil fuels. This chemical engineering discovery brings that closer to reality.

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Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water?
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Hydrogen powered vehicles offer a clean alternative to running cars with fossil fuels. This chemical engineering discovery brings that closer to reality.

Renewables | Reuters/Mike Blake

Last modified Fri, 1 Apr, 2016 at 8:56

On the road to a safer driving experience

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Research News

By testing the physical limits of speeding cars, a group of engineers hope to develop safer autonomous driving systems.

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On the road to a safer driving experience
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Engineers test autonomous car algorithms in the quest for safer driving.

Shelley, Stanford's autonomous Audi TTS, on the track at Thunderhill Raceway north of Sacramento, Calif. | Stanford News Service/Steve Fyffe

        

When Stanford's autonomous car Shelley nears speeds of 120 mph as it tears around a racetrack without a driver, observers' natural inclinations are to exchange high-fives or simply mouth, "wow."

Last modified Mon, 14 Mar, 2016 at 15:53

Martin Hellman: Finding the truth is more important than getting your way

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Research Profile

An inventor of public key cryptography explains why listening is the key to solving problems — in one's personal life and everywhere else.

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Martin Hellman: Finding the truth is more important than getting your way
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The co-inventor of public key cryptography explains why listening is the key to solving problems — in one's personal life and everywhere else.

Cryptography remains as controversial today as it was in the mid-1970s when Martin Hellman was doing
his seminal work. | Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Last modified Mon, 14 Mar, 2016 at 15:55