Electronics and Photonics

​Yi Cui: How nano materials can help improve everything from batteries to face masks

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Research News

By focusing on structures that are infinitesimally small, a prolific engineer initiates a series of very big things.

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​Yi Cui: How nano materials can help improve everything from batteries to face masks
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By focusing on structures that are infinitesimally small, a prolific engineer initiates a series of very big things.

Yi Cui | Photo by Matt Beardsley/SLAC

           

What do a battery, a facemask and a solar cell have in common?

Last modified Fri, 29 Apr, 2016 at 9:26

How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage

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A team of engineers obtain a first look inside phase-changing nanoparticles and find that their structure significantly influences performance.

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How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage
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A team of engineers obtain a first look inside phase-changing nanoparticles and find that their structure significantly influences performance.

Stanford engineers studying the structures of phase-changing nanoparticles have found that shape matters. Materials composed of cubes and pyramids, for instance, may yield more efficient batteries than those made of icosahedrons which are 20-sided polyhedrons. | Image courtesy Dionne Group

Last modified Tue, 26 Apr, 2016 at 12:11

​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin

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A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

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​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin
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A team of engineers explore how a new kind of wearable electronics could restore sensation to people with prosthetic limbs.

Can we build better prostheses? | REUTERS/Mary Schwalm

Last modified Fri, 22 Apr, 2016 at 13:57

How could we use the tiniest specs of diamonds?

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Research News

Extracting nanodiamonds from crude oil could help produce next-generation tools for imaging and communications.

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How could we use the tiniest specs of diamonds?
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Extracting nanodiamonds from crude oil could help to produce next-generation tools for imaging and communications.

Too small to see with the naked eye, diamondoids are visible only when they clump together in fine, sugar-like crystals like these. | Photo by Christopher Smith, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Last modified Mon, 11 Apr, 2016 at 8:20

Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water?

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Hydrogen powered vehicles offer a clean alternative to running cars with fossil fuels. This chemical engineering discovery brings that closer to reality.

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Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water?
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Hydrogen powered vehicles offer a clean alternative to running cars with fossil fuels. This chemical engineering discovery brings that closer to reality.

Renewables | Reuters/Mike Blake

Last modified Fri, 1 Apr, 2016 at 8:56

On the road to a safer driving experience

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By testing the physical limits of speeding cars, a group of engineers hope to develop safer autonomous driving systems.

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On the road to a safer driving experience
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Engineers test autonomous car algorithms in the quest for safer driving.

Shelley, Stanford's autonomous Audi TTS, on the track at Thunderhill Raceway north of Sacramento, Calif. | Stanford News Service/Steve Fyffe

        

When Stanford's autonomous car Shelley nears speeds of 120 mph as it tears around a racetrack without a driver, observers' natural inclinations are to exchange high-fives or simply mouth, "wow."

Last modified Mon, 14 Mar, 2016 at 15:53

Martin Hellman: Finding the truth is more important than getting your way

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Research Profile

An inventor of public key cryptography explains why listening is the key to solving problems — in one's personal life and everywhere else.

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Martin Hellman: Finding the truth is more important than getting your way
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The co-inventor of public key cryptography explains why listening is the key to solving problems — in one's personal life and everywhere else.

Cryptography remains as controversial today as it was in the mid-1970s when Martin Hellman was doing
his seminal work. | Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Last modified Mon, 14 Mar, 2016 at 15:55

Stanford cryptography pioneers win the ACM 2015 A.M. Turing Award

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A groundbreaking algorithm from Martin Hellman and Whitfield Diffie enabled a secure Internet.

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Stanford cryptography pioneers win the ACM 2015 A.M. Turing Award
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A groundbreaking algorithm from Martin Hellman and Whitfield Diffie enabled a secure Internet.

Stanford's Martin Hellman, center, and Whitfield Diffie, right, winners of the 2015 A.M. Turing Award, are shown with Ralph Merkle of UC Berkeley in this 1977 photo. | Chuck Painter / Stanford News Service

Last modified Mon, 14 Mar, 2016 at 15:54

Pioneering Stanford computer researcher and educator Edward McCluskey dies

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The professor emeritus who paved the way for everything from complex chips to crash-proof computers, and who trained 75 PhDs, also loved quirky hats and nature.

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Pioneering Stanford computer researcher and educator Edward McCluskey dies
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The professor emeritus who paved the way for everything from complex chips to crash-proof computers, and who trained 75 PhDs, also loved quirky hats and nature.

Edward J. McCluskey, a professor emeritus at Stanford whose research helped pave the way for electronics and computing, died on Feb. 13. He was 86.

Born on the eve of the Great Depression, McCluskey graduated from Bowdoin College in Maine in 1953, earning honors in mathematics and physics, then went on to study electrical engineering at MIT, where he earned his doctorate in 1956.

Last modified Thu, 25 Feb, 2016 at 12:42

Can large-scale solar power storage become a reality?

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Research News

An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce, store and consume energy.

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Can large-scale solar power storage become a reality?
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An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce, store and consume energy.

The solar energy of the past? | Reuters/Stringer

Last modified Tue, 22 Mar, 2016 at 14:04