Electronics and Photonics

A group of scholars look to early 20th century radio technology to help improve Internet security

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Type: 
Research News

A new study shows how harnessing the quantum properties of light can create a transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping.

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Scholars look to radio for Internet security
Short Dek: 
Study shows properties of light can create transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping

Imagine communicating with your bank, the IRS or your doctor by way of an Internet that was perfectly secure. Your most private data would be protected with absolute certainty and, better yet, if any bad actor were to try to eavesdrop you would know immediately. Such is the promise of secure quantum communication. 

Last modified Tue, 2 Feb, 2016 at 9:14

New Stanford battery shuts down at high temperatures and restarts when it cools

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Type: 
Research News

Stanford researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that turns on and off depending on the temperature. The new technology could prevent battery fires that have plagued laptops, hoverboards and other electronic devices.

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Lithium-ion battery shuts down before overheating
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Researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that could prevent battery fires

Stanford researchers have developed the first lithium-ion battery that shuts down before overheating, then restarts immediately when the temperature cools.

Last modified Wed, 3 Feb, 2016 at 8:09

Stanford-led skyscraper-style chip design could boost electronic performance by factor of a thousand

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Type: 
Research Profile

In modern computer systems, processor and memory chips are laid out like single-story structures in a suburb. But suburban layouts waste time and energy. A new skyscraper-like design, based on materials more advanced than silicon, provides the next computing platform.

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Skyscraper-style chip moves data faster
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New design, based on materials more advanced than silicon, provides the next computing platform

For decades, engineers have designed computer systems with processors and memory chips laid out like single-story structures in a suburb. Wires connect these chips like streets, carrying digital traffic between the processors that compute data and the memory chips that store it.

But suburban-style layouts create long commutes and regular traffic jams in electronic circuits, wasting time and energy.

Last modified Fri, 11 Dec, 2015 at 9:20

Graphene key to high-density, energy-efficient memory chips, Stanford engineers say

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Type: 
Research News

Only an atom thick, graphene is a key ingredient in three Stanford projects to create data storage technologies that use nanomaterials other than standard silicon.

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Graphene improves data storage
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Graphene key to high-density, energy-efficient memory chips

The memory chips in phones, laptops and other electronic devices need to be small, fast and draw as little power as possible. For years, silicon chips have delivered on that promise.

But to dramatically extend the battery life of mobile gadgets, and to create data centers that use far less energy, engineers are developing memory chips based on new nanomaterials with capabilities that silicon can't match.

Last modified Fri, 23 Oct, 2015 at 15:22

Leonardo Art/Science Evening Rendezvous (LASER Series)

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Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvoux    Thursday, October 15, 2015
    7:00 pm
    Li Ka Shing, Room 120

 

Date/Time: 
Thursday, October 15, 2015. 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Office of Science Outreach
Contact Info: 
scaruffi@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Fri, 10 Jul, 2015 at 9:51

Stanford's GCEP awards $10.5 million for research on renewable energy

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Research News

Stanford scientists and an international research group receive funding to advance solar cells, batteries, renewable fuels and bioenergy.

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Multiple energy projects receive grants
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GCEP awards foster continued research into renewable energy

The Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) at Stanford University has awarded $10.5 million for seven research projects designed to advance a broad range of renewable energy technologies. The funding will be shared by six Stanford research teams and an international group from the United States and Europe.

Last modified Wed, 8 Oct, 2014 at 12:47

A high-resolution endoscope as thin as a human hair

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Research News

Engineers at Stanford have developed a prototype single-fiber endoscope that improves the resolution of these much-sought-after instruments fourfold over existing designs. The advance could lead to an era of needle-thin, minimally invasive endoscopes able to view features out of reach of today’s instruments.

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A Hair-thin Endoscope
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New single-fiber endoscope improves resolution fourfold over existing designs.

Engineers at Stanford have demonstrated a high-resolution endoscope that is as thin as a human hair with a resolution four times better than previous devices of similar design. The so-called micro-endoscope is a significant step forward in high-resolution, minimally invasive bio-imaging with potential applications in research and clinical practice.  Micro-endoscopy could enable new methods in diverse fields ranging from study of the brain to early cancer detection.

Last modified Thu, 28 Mar, 2013 at 12:12

Peel-and-stick solar panels

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Type: 
Research News

Decal-like application process allows thin, flexible solar panels to be applied to virtually any surface from business cards to roofs to window panes.

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Peel-and-Stick Solar
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Solar cell "decals” point to wide range of new products and applications.

For all their promise, solar cells have frustrated scientists in one crucial regard – most are rigid. They must be deployed in stiff and often heavy fixed panels, limiting their applications. So researchers have been trying to get photovoltaics to loosen up. The ideal:  flexible, decal-like solar panels that can be peeled off like band-aids and stuck to virtually any surface, from papers to window panes. 

Last modified Thu, 20 Dec, 2012 at 14:42

"Haptics Systems for Education" Open House

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ME 327 Final Project Demonstrations

Tuesday, Dec. 11 from 10 am to 12 pm

Building 550 (Peterson) Atrium

Http://me327.stanford.edu

Professor Allison Okamura

Date/Time: 
Tuesday, December 11, 2012. 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Location: 
Building 550 (Peterson) Atrium
Sponsors: 
ME 327: Design and Control of Haptic Systems

Last modified Wed, 5 Dec, 2012 at 13:24

Stanford Engineering's Shanhui Fan Receives $400,000 Award from Department of Energy

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Type: 
Award

Professor of Electrical Engineering will develop new reflective coatings to help cool buildings and cars.

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Fan Wins ARPA-E Grant
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Will develop reflective coatings to cool buildings and cars.

Shanhui Fan, a professor of electrical engineering at the Stanford School of Engineering, has been chosen to receive $399,901 to develop Photonic Radiative Day-Time Cooling Devices, better imagined as coatings for the rooftops of buildings and cars that reflect sunlight, allowing heat to escape and enabling passive cooling, even when the sun is shining. Fan’s device would require no electricity and would reduce the need for air conditioning, leading to energy and cost savings.

Last modified Fri, 11 Jan, 2013 at 12:37