Life Sciences and Healthcare

Interactive Biotechnology - Ingmar Riedel-Kruse

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CS547 Human-Computer Interaction Seminars  (Seminar on People, Computers, and Design)

Fridays 12:30-2:20 pm, Open to the public

Gates Building, Rm B01

Date/Time: 
Friday, February 5, 2016. 12:30 pm - 1:50 pm
Admission: 
Free, opent to the public

Last modified Mon, 1 Feb, 2016 at 16:50

ME Women's Seminar, Barbara Beskind, Conceptual Designer, IDEO- Learn To Lead, Lead to Learn

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The ME Graduate Women's Group has offered ME/ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives, a 1-unit credit seminar, every year since the group's inception in 1998. For credit or not, everyone is welcome to come! Speakers are asked to address the factors, experiences, and lessons that have been particularly important to their success in industry, academia, and... life. 

4:15pm Social | 4:30pm Seminar starts

Date/Time: 
Thursday, February 11, 2016. 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Sandia National Laboratories, General Motors, AT&T, Lockheed Martin, the Vice Provost of Engineering Education, and the School of Engineering Alumni Relations Progra
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Thu, 28 Jan, 2016 at 10:07

Perspectives in Assitive Technology - Barbara Beskind, Conceptual Designer, IDEO

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ENGR110/210
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 4:30 - 5:50pm
Thornton Center, Classroom 110
Open to the public

 

Abstract:

Date/Time: 
Tuesday, January 26, 2016. 4:30 pm - 5:50 pm
Location: 
Thornton 110
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Fri, 22 Jan, 2016 at 17:14

Fei-Fei Li: How do we teach computers to understand the visual world?

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Type: 
Research Profile

A computer scientist explores ‘the dark matter of our digital universe.’

Slug: 
How do we teach computers to understand the visual world?
Short Dek: 
A computer scientist explores ‘the dark matter of our digital universe.’

Artificial intelligence has been on a six-decade ascent into realms once dominated by human experts. You know the highlights. Today computers regularly beat the world’s best chess masters at their own game. IBM’s Watson supercomputer has defeated all comers on Jeopardy! Algorithms regularly parse Twitter traffic to gauge public sentiment on everything from Taylor Swift’s new album to the direction of the stock market. And voice recognition apps such as Siri allow us to issue voice commands to smart phones.

Last modified Mon, 25 Jan, 2016 at 10:17

ME Women's Seminar, Melinda Cromie - Learn To Lead, Lead to Learn

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The ME Graduate Women's Group has offered ME/ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives, a 1-unit credit seminar, every year since the group's inception in 1998. For credit or not, everyone is welcome to come! Speakers are asked to address the factors, experiences, and lessons that have been particularly important to their success in industry, academia, and... life. 

4:15pm Social | 4:30pm Seminar starts

Date/Time: 
Thursday, January 28, 2016. 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Sandia National Laboratories, General Motors, AT&T, Lockheed Martin, the Vice Provost of Engineering Education, and the School of Engineering Alumni Relations Program
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Thu, 28 Jan, 2016 at 12:56

ME Women's Seminar, Narges Bani Asadi - Learn To Lead, Lead to Learn

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The ME Graduate Women's Group has offered ME/ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives, a 1-unit credit seminar, every year since the group's inception in 1998. For credit or not, everyone is welcome to come! Speakers are asked to address the factors, experiences, and lessons that have been particularly important to their success in industry, academia, and... life. 

4:15pm Social | 4:30pm Seminar starts

Date/Time: 
Thursday, January 21, 2016. 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Sandia National Laboratories, General Motors, AT&T, Lockheed Martin, the Vice Provost of Engineering Education, and the School of Engineering Alumni Relations Program
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Thu, 14 Jan, 2016 at 11:37

Careers and Research: a Personal Perspective - John L. Hennessy

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Translation Research and Applied Medicine (TRAM) Lecture

Careers and Research: a Personal Perspective
3:00-4:00 PM, Berg Hall – Li Ka Shing Center, Reception will follow.

John L. Hennessy

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, January 13, 2016. 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Contact Info: 
jlili@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Open to all members of the campus community.

Last modified Mon, 11 Jan, 2016 at 16:38

New microscopy technique maps mechanical properties of living cells

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Type: 
Research News

Researchers have developed a new way to use atomic force microscopy to rapidly measure the mechanical properties of cells at the nanometer scale, an advance that could pave the way for better understanding immune disorders and cancer.

Slug: 
Technique maps properties of living cells
Short Dek: 
Measuring mechanical properties of cells to understand immune disorders, cancer

In his role as a pediatrician, Manish Butte, MD, PhD, will often push and prod a patient’s abdomen, feeling for abnormalities — a swollen spleen, a hardened lymph node or an unusual lump in the intestines or liver. There are still some things that can only be gleaned by touch, and Butte believes this notion applies to individual cells as well.

Last modified Wed, 3 Feb, 2016 at 8:08

Stunning diversity of gut bacteria uncovered by new approach to gene sequencing devised at Stanford

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Type: 
Research News

A new technique can reveal subtle differences among the genomes of multiple species and subspecies of microbes.

Slug: 
New technique reveals gut bacteria diversity
Short Dek: 
New approach to gene sequencing devised at Stanford

A collaboration between computer science engineers and geneticists at Stanford University has produced a novel technique for mapping the diversity of bacteria living in the human gut.

The new approach revealed a far more diverse community than the researchers had anticipated. “The bacteria are genetically much more heterogeneous than we thought,” said Michael Snyder, PhD, professor and chair of genetics.

Last modified Tue, 15 Dec, 2015 at 14:26

Stanford engineers invent process to accelerate protein evolution

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Type: 
Research News

A new tool enables researchers to test millions of mutated proteins in a matter of hours or days, speeding the search for new medicines, industrial enzymes and biosensors.

Slug: 
Researchers invent process to accelerate protein evolution
Short Dek: 
Stanford engineers can test millions of protein variants in a matter of hours

All living things require proteins, members of a vast family of molecules that nature "makes to order" according to the blueprints in DNA.

Through the natural process of evolution, DNA mutations generate new or more effective proteins. Humans have found so many alternative uses for these molecules – as foods, industrial enzymes, anti-cancer drugs – that scientists are eager to better understand how to engineer protein variants designed for specific uses.

Last modified Thu, 10 Dec, 2015 at 16:25