Life Sciences and Healthcare

​Research shows that different brain cells process positive and negative experiences

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Researchers reveal that neurons in the prefrontal cortex are built to respond to reward or aversion, a finding with implications for treating mental illness and addictions.

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​Research shows that different brain cells process positive and negative experiences
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Researchers reveal that neurons in the prefrontal cortex are built to respond to reward or aversion, a finding with implications for treating mental illness and addictions.

3D CLARITY shows connections from prefrontal cortex across an entire transparent mouse brain. | Courtesy Li Ye and Karl Deisseroth, Stanford University

Last modified Fri, 27 May, 2016 at 12:48

​Alexandria Boehm: How we can help save the coastal marine ecosystem

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A civil and environmental engineer leads efforts to counteract the acidification and degradation of marine environments, especially along the northern Pacific Coast.

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​Alexandria Boehm: How we can help save the coastal marine ecosystem
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A civil and environmental engineer leads efforts to counteract the acidification and degradation of marine environments, especially along the northern Pacific Coast.

A pelagic pteropod, species probably Limacina helicina | Russ Hopcroft/NOAA

Last modified Tue, 24 May, 2016 at 11:35

​Stanford-NIST collaboration aims to give the bio-economy a big boost by measuring tiny things

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​The Joint Initiative for Metrology in Biology will bring together academic, government and industrial scientists to improve the measurement techniques, or metrology, of molecular products and processes.

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​Stanford-NIST collaboration aims to give the bio-economy a big boost by measuring tiny things
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​The Joint Initiative for Metrology in Biology will bring together academic, government and industrial scientists to improve the measurement techniques, or metrology, of molecular products and processes.

A collaboration to spur the 21st Century bioeconomy | By Tricia Seibold

     

​On this day in 1875, representatives from 17 nations signed the Meter Convention, establishing a global process for setting the uniform measures that help lay the foundation for commerce, industry and science advances in the 20th century.

Last modified Fri, 20 May, 2016 at 14:07

Rethinking one of medicine’s trusty staples: the urinary dipstick

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A low-cost, portable system that uses this trusty test strip could let patients get accurate urinalysis results at home, potentially easing the workload of primary care physicians.

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Rethinking one of medicine’s trusty staples: the urinary dipstick
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A low-cost, portable system that uses this trusty test strip could let patients get accurate urinalysis results at home, potentially easing the workload of primary care physicians.

Simple and powerful, but imperfect | iStock/Eshma

      

There’s a good reason your doctor asks for a urine sample at your annual checkup. A simple, color-changing paper test, dipped into the specimen, can measure levels of glucose, blood, protein and other chemicals, which in turn can indicate evidence of kidney disease, diabetes, urinary tract infections and even signs of bladder cancer.

Last modified Tue, 17 May, 2016 at 14:56

David Camarillo: There is hope for concussion prevention

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Research Profile

​Armed with new insights on traumatic brain injuries, a Stanford bioengineer advocates rethinking the designs and standards of protective gear.

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David Camarillo: There is hope for concussion prevention
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​Armed with new insights on traumatic brain injuries, a Stanford bioengineer advocates rethinking the designs and standards of protective gear.

Bike riding is the leading cause of concussions in kids. | REUTERS/Vivek Prakash

   

For David Camarillo, concussions are a personal matter.

Last modified Wed, 11 May, 2016 at 14:15

How seawater salts affect coastal algae — for good and bad

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Research Profile

Active chemical agents in saltwater help break down the byproducts of coastal algae in ways that seem to counteract deadly algal bloom — but may also have other, less desirable effects.

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How seawater salts affect coastal algae — for good and bad
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Active chemical agents in saltwater help break down the byproducts of coastal algae in ways that seem to counteract deadly algal bloom — but may also have other, less desirable effects.

Red-orange algal bloom in the Puget Sound | Photo by Jeri Cusimano/EcologyWA/Creative Commons

   

Scientists have long studied the role that free radicals play in freshwater because of how these charged compounds affect the chemistry of our drinking water. The special nature of these processes in saltwater ecosystems, however, has been poorly understood.

Last modified Wed, 11 May, 2016 at 14:19

​Innovations in medical imaging are reshaping the war against cancer

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​A biologist discusses an advanced imaging technique that can help detect early-stage tumors and guide surgeons with precision.

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​Innovations in medical imaging are reshaping the war against cancer
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​A biologist discusses an advanced imaging technique that can help detect early-stage tumors and guide surgeons with precision.

Minuscule gold nanoparticles glom onto and help identify tumor cells. | Photo by Yonatan Winetraub/Stanford School of Medicine

Last modified Fri, 13 May, 2016 at 7:53

Studying a 'Silly Putty' protein could spur efforts to repair damaged human tissues

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New insights into collagen, the stretchy protein that provides a stiff cushion for cells, aids our understanding of regenerative medicine.

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Studying a 'Silly Putty' protein could spur efforts to repair damaged human tissues
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New insights into collagen, the stretchy protein that provides a stiff cushion for cells, aids our understanding of regenerative medicine.


Stanford researchers are studying the way collagen moves between stiff and elastic states in the human body. | Image by Sebastian Kaulitzki/Shutterstock

Last modified Wed, 4 May, 2016 at 10:35

​Yi Cui: How nano materials can help improve everything from batteries to face masks

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By focusing on structures that are infinitesimally small, a prolific engineer initiates a series of very big things.

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​Yi Cui: How nano materials can help improve everything from batteries to face masks
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By focusing on structures that are infinitesimally small, a prolific engineer initiates a series of very big things.

Yi Cui | Photo by Matt Beardsley/SLAC

           

What do a battery, a facemask and a solar cell have in common?

Last modified Wed, 4 May, 2016 at 8:36

​What is the relationship between communicable illnesses and illicit drug use?

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Research News

​A scholar applies the mathematical tools of management science to help improve human health.

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​What is the relationship between communicable illnesses and illicit drug use?
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​A scholar applies the mathematical tools of management science to help improve human health.

Is methadone a cost-effective strategy for treating heroin addiction? | REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Last modified Wed, 27 Apr, 2016 at 14:33