Life Sciences and Healthcare

Leonardo Art/Science Evening Rendezvous (LASER Series)

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    Leonardo Art Science Evening RendezvouxThursday, August 13, 2015
    7:00 pm
    Li Ka Shing, Room 120

 

Date/Time: 
Thursday, August 13, 2015. 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Sponsors: 
Office of Science Outreach
Contact Info: 
scaruffi@stanford.edu
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Fri, 10 Jul, 2015 at 10:47

NIST workshop at Stanford mulls ‘weights and measures’ for biotechnology

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Type: 
Research News

Researchers from academia, industry and government launch effort to define standards for using bits and pieces of molecular biomachinery to create things such as vaccines, drugs and biosensors.

Slug: 
NIST standards for biotechnology
Short Dek: 
NIST researchers launch effort to define standards for using biotechnology to create things such as vaccines, drugs and biosensors

Just as defining the meter, kilogram and second helped lay the foundation for modern commerce, new measures and standards are needed to fuel the growth of the 21st Century bioeconomy.

The desire to create these new metrics brought more than 100 researchers from academia, industry and government to Stanford University on March 31st to launch a consortium convened by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST.

Last modified Thu, 16 Apr, 2015 at 9:49

Beth Pruitt elected a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers

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Type: 
Research News

In an interdisciplinary blend of engineering and medicine, Pruitt seeks to detect and measure the minute forces generated by living cells.

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Pruitt elected fellow of ASME
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Professor elected fellow of ASME for research on creating micro-electrical systems (MEMS)

Associate Professor Beth Pruitt has been elected a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) for work that includes a focus on creating micro-electrical systems (MEMS) to detect the minute forces that cells exert upon one another as they carry out the basic mechanics of life.

Last modified Thu, 7 May, 2015 at 14:50

Stanford team invents sensor that uses radio waves to detect subtle changes in pressure

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Type: 
Research News

Device is used to monitor brain pressure in lab mice as prelude to possible use with human patients; future applications of this pressure-sensing technology could lead to touch-sensitive “skin” for prosthetic devices.

Slug: 
Wireless sensor measures pressure
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Sensor uses radio waves to detect subtle changes in pressure

Stanford engineers have invented a wireless pressure sensor that has already been used to measure brain pressure in lab mice with brain injuries.

The underlying technology has such broad potential that it could one day be used to create skin-like materials that can sense pressure, leading to prosthetic devices with the electronic equivalent of a sense of touch.

Last modified Fri, 10 Oct, 2014 at 10:14

Stanford engineers developing miniature wireless device to create better way of studying chronic pain

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Type: 
Research News

A team of Stanford engineers is creating a small wireless device that will improve studies of chronic pain. The engineers hope to use what they learn to develop better therapies for the condition, which costs the economy $600 billion a year.

Slug: 
Wireless device to study pain
Short Dek: 
Stanford engineers are creating a small wireless device to improve studies of chronic pain

Ada Poon, a Stanford assistant professor of electrical engineering, is a master at building minuscule wireless devices that function in the body and can be powered remotely. Now, she and collaborators in bioengineering and anesthesia want to leverage this technology to develop a way of studying – and eventually developing treatments for – pain.

Last modified Wed, 8 Oct, 2014 at 13:59

Stanford researchers take a step toward developing a ‘universal’ flu vaccine

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Type: 
Research Profile

Stanford engineers are working to create a flu vaccine that could be produced more quickly and offer broader protection than what is available today.

Slug: 
Advancements in Flu Protection
Short Dek: 
Stanford engineers working to create a flu vaccine that could offer broader protection than what's available today.

Every year the approach of flu season sets off a medical guessing game with life or death consequences. There are many different strains of flu, and they vary from year to year. So each season authorities must make an educated guess and tell manufacturers which variants of the flu they should produce vaccines against.

Even when this system works, flu-related illnesses can kill 3,000 to 49,000 Americans annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A bad guess or the unexpected emergence of a virulent strain could send the death toll higher.

Last modified Mon, 21 Jul, 2014 at 15:49

Stanford Bioengineering Assistant Professor Honored by White House

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Type: 
Award

Drew Endy named an Open Science Champion of Change.

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Bioengineer Honored by White House
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Asst. Prof. Drew Endy named a Champion of Change

Drew Endy, a synthetic biologist and assistant professor of bioengineering, has been honored by the White House as part of its Champions of Change Open Science program, which recognizes those who promote and use “open scientific data and publications to accelerate progress and improve our world.”

Last modified Tue, 9 Jul, 2013 at 18:15

Getting CLARITY: Hydrogel process developed at Stanford creates transparent brain

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Type: 
Research News

Stanford bioengineers have transformed an intact, post-mortem mouse brain into a transparent three-dimensional structure that keeps all the fine wiring and molecular structures in place. Known as CLARITY, the technique stands to transform our understanding of the brain and indeed of any biological tissue.

Slug: 
A Clear Mind
Short Dek: 
New hydrogel process creates a transparent brain.

Combining neuroscience and chemical engineering, researchers at Stanford University have developed a process that renders a mouse brain transparent. The postmortem brain remains whole — not sliced or sectioned in any way — with its three-dimensional complexity of fine wiring and molecular structures completely intact and able to be measured and probed with visible light and chemicals.

Last modified Fri, 6 Dec, 2013 at 14:45

President Obama's new $100 million brain research initiative taps several Stanford scientists

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Type: 
Press Release

The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) project, which calls for initial federal funding of $100 million, will make use of several innovative technologies invented by Stanford scientists.

Slug: 
$100 Million for Brain Research
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Brain research project will make use of several innovative technologies invented by Stanford scientists.

President Barack Obama announced today a bold research initiative aimed at developing new technologies and methods for understanding the human brain. Several Stanford scientists will play critical roles in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) project, which calls for initial funding of $100 million.

Last modified Wed, 3 Apr, 2013 at 10:19

Biological transistor enables computing within living cells

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Type: 
Research News

A team of Stanford University bioengineers has taken computing beyond mechanics and electronics into the living realm of biology. They have developed a biological transistor made from genetic material — DNA and RNA. The team calls its invention the “transcriptor.”

Slug: 
A Genetic Transistor
Short Dek: 
Bioengineers take computing into the living realm of biology.

When Charles Babbage prototyped the first computing machine in the 19th century, he imagined using mechanical gears and latches to control information. ENIAC, the first modern computer developed in the 1940s, used vacuum tubes and electricity. Today, computers use transistors made from highly engineered semiconducting materials to carry out their logical operations.

Last modified Thu, 28 Mar, 2013 at 11:01