Material Science

MEET THE MAKERS Winter 2016 Student Showcase

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9:30 am
Wednesday, March 16, 2016
The Atrium, Peterson Building 550, Stanford  Map

 

Date/Time: 
Wednesday, March 16, 2016. 9:30 am - 11:30 am
Admission: 
Free, open to the public

Last modified Thu, 11 Feb, 2016 at 15:33

Meet "Hedgehog": Your tour guide to asteroids, comets and other things that whirl around the solar system

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Type: 
Research News

A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

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Robotic space hedgehog will hop, flip and spin to explore asteroids.
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A team of engineers builds a cube-like rover for exploration in some of the most extreme conditions in space.

Your best guess is that the landscape is as inhospitable as it gets: an irregular range of sharp boulders and loose rubble piles strewn among jagged crevasses and deep troughs of dust. But then again, it’s just a guess because no one’s ever actually seen this landscape up close. Now imagine that you need to send a robot across that landscape, from a perch at the lip of a steep crater to the edge of an ice-encrusted hole 1,000 meters away. And imagine that gravity is a tiny fraction of what we have on Earth.

Last modified Fri, 5 Feb, 2016 at 9:51

A group of scholars look to early 20th century radio technology to help improve Internet security

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Research News

A new study shows how harnessing the quantum properties of light can create a transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping.

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Scholars look to radio for Internet security
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Study shows properties of light can create transmission technology impervious to eavesdropping

Imagine communicating with your bank, the IRS or your doctor by way of an Internet that was perfectly secure. Your most private data would be protected with absolute certainty and, better yet, if any bad actor were to try to eavesdrop you would know immediately. Such is the promise of secure quantum communication. 

Last modified Tue, 2 Feb, 2016 at 9:14

Oleg D. Sherby, professor of materials science and engineering, dies at 90

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Research News

Hailed for the discovery of superplastic steel, Sherby was a professor at Stanford for 30 years. He was known on campus for his affable manner and for organizing volleyball matches and poker games.

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Oleg Sherby, materials science professor, dies at 90
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Oleg Sherby, materials science professor emeritus who discovered superplastic steel dies at age 90

Oleg Dimitri Sherby, a professor emeritus at Stanford best known for his discovery of superplastic steel, died Nov. 9 at his home in Menlo Park. He was 90 years old.

Last modified Wed, 13 Jan, 2016 at 11:24

New Stanford battery shuts down at high temperatures and restarts when it cools

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Research News

Stanford researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that turns on and off depending on the temperature. The new technology could prevent battery fires that have plagued laptops, hoverboards and other electronic devices.

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Lithium-ion battery shuts down before overheating
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Researchers have invented a lithium-ion battery that could prevent battery fires

Stanford researchers have developed the first lithium-ion battery that shuts down before overheating, then restarts immediately when the temperature cools.

Last modified Wed, 3 Feb, 2016 at 8:09

Stanford-led skyscraper-style chip design could boost electronic performance by factor of a thousand

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Research Profile

In modern computer systems, processor and memory chips are laid out like single-story structures in a suburb. But suburban layouts waste time and energy. A new skyscraper-like design, based on materials more advanced than silicon, provides the next computing platform.

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Skyscraper-style chip moves data faster
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New design, based on materials more advanced than silicon, provides the next computing platform

For decades, engineers have designed computer systems with processors and memory chips laid out like single-story structures in a suburb. Wires connect these chips like streets, carrying digital traffic between the processors that compute data and the memory chips that store it.

But suburban-style layouts create long commutes and regular traffic jams in electronic circuits, wasting time and energy.

Last modified Fri, 11 Dec, 2015 at 9:20

New Battery Design Could Help Solar and Wind Energy Power the Grid

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Research News

Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have designed a low-cost, long-life battery that could enable solar and wind energy to become major suppliers to the electrical grid.

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Powering the Grid
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New battery design may be the best yet to regulate the natural fluctuations of renewable energy sources.

Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have designed a low-cost, long-life battery that could enable solar and wind energy to become major suppliers to the electrical grid.

Last modified Fri, 3 May, 2013 at 14:12

Materials Scientists Make Solar Energy Chip 100 Times More Efficient

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Research Profile

Scientists working at the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) have improved an innovative solar-energy device to be about 100 times more efficient than its previous design in converting the sun's light and heat into electricity.

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Harnessing the Sun
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Materials scientists make solar energy chip 100 times more efficient.

In a report last week in Nature Communications, the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) described how they improved a solar-energy device's efficiency from a few hundredths of a percent to nearly 2 percent, and said they expect to achieve at least another 10-fold gain in the future.

Last modified Thu, 28 Mar, 2013 at 12:10

New optical tweezers trap specimens just a few nanometers across

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Type: 
Press Release

A microscale technique known as optical trapping uses beams of light as tweezers to hold and manipulate tiny particles. Stanford researchers have found a new way to trap particles smaller than 10 nanometers - and potentially down to just a few atoms in size – which until now have escaped light’s grasp.

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New Optical Tweezer
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Light-based tweezers trap particles just a few atoms in size.

To grasp and move microscopic objects, such as bacteria and the components of living cells, scientists can harness the power of concentrated light to manipulate them without ever physically touching them. 

Now, doctoral student Amr Saleh and Assistant Professor Jennifer Dionne, researchers at the Stanford School of Engineering, have designed an innovative light aperture that allows them to optically trap smaller objects than ever before – potentially just a few atoms in size. 

Last modified Thu, 13 Dec, 2012 at 10:09

Engineering Hero Craig Barrett Talks Research Universities and Competitiveness

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Press Release

In an interview on the day of his induction as a Stanford Engineering Hero, Craig Barrett, a former professor in the School of Engineering who rose to be CEO/Chairman of Intel, reminisced about his career, the central role of research universities in America’s economic past and future, and how to remain competitive going forward.

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Craig Barrett, Engineering Hero
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Former professor and Intel chief reminisces and looks ahead

In 1974, Craig Barrett was a Professor of Materials Science at Stanford Engineering with tenure and all the other inducements of academia when fate intervened. Barrett accepted an offer to join a nearby semiconductor maker named Intel, then in just its fifth year of operation. 

Last modified Mon, 3 Dec, 2012 at 11:10