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Stanford faculty elected to the National Academy of Engineering

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Stanford faculty elected to the National Academy of Engineering

Three faculty members in the School of Engineering have been elected to join the academy, among the highest professional distinctions accorded engineers.
The faculty members are among the 110 researchers nominated and chosen by their peers to join the academy this year | Photo by Andrew Brodhead

Thomas Kenny, who serves as senior associate dean for student affairs and the Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering; Marc Levoy, the VMware Founders Professor in Computer Science, Emeritus, in the School of Engineering; Stephen Monismith, the Obayashi Professor in the School of Engineering; and Louis Durlofsky, the Otto N. Miller Professor in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering, have been elected to the 2022 class of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE).

The Stanford faculty members are among the 110 researchers nominated and chosen by their peers to join the academy this year, which is among the highest professional distinctions accorded engineers.

Thomas Kenny, who serves as senior associate dean for student affairs and the Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering, was elected for his contributions to the performance enhancement and commercialization of silicon MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) resonators for timing applications. Because this research field is multidisciplinary in nature, work in Kenny’s group is characterized by strong collaborations with faculty within other departments at Stanford, with colleagues at other universities, as well as with local industry. He is a professor of mechanical engineering.

Marc Levoy, the VMware Founders Professor in Computer Science, Emeritus, in the School of Engineering, was cited for his contributions to computer graphics and digital photography. Levoy’s research interests include the science and art of photography, computational photography, light field sensing and display, and applications of computer graphics in microscopy and biology. Since retiring, Levoy became a distinguished engineer at Google, then vice president and fellow at Adobe Inc.

Stephen Monismith, the Obayashi Professor in the School of Engineering, was recognized for the development of physically-based understanding of freshwater and coastal fluid environments for ecosystem health and sustainable management. His current research includes studies of estuarine hydrodynamics and mixing processes, flows over coral reefs and on the inner shelf, turbulence in density stratified fluids, and physical-biological interactions in phytoplankton and benthic systems. He is a professor of civil and environmental engineering.

Louis Durlofsky, Otto N. Miller Professor in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences (Stanford Earth), has been recognized for the development of innovative modeling and optimization techniques to enable the recovery of hydrocarbon and water resources. His research involves the development of computational methods for the effective management of subsurface flow operations, with applications ranging from the recovery of oil and gas to the geological storage of carbon dioxide. Durlofsky co-directs the Stanford Smart Fields Consortium, the Stanford Center for Carbon Storage and the Stanford Reservoir Simulation Research Consortium.

The NAE also elected Robert Madix, the Charles Lee Powell Professor in the School Of Engineering, Emeritus, who is currently a senior research fellow at Harvard University and Kenneth Peters, an adjunct professor in the Department of Geological Sciences.

The NAE announcement brings its total U.S. membership to 2,338. The 22 new international members announced this week bring non-U.S. membership to 310. Newly elected members will be formally inducted during the NAE’s annual meeting on Oct. 2, 2022.


Source URL: https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/stanford-faculty-elected-national-academy-engineering