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Warren Hausman

Warren Hausman

Emeritus
Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus
PhD, MIT (1966)

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Professor Hausman performs research in operations planning and control, with specific interests in supply chain management. Most of his contributions are based upon quantitative modeling techniques and emphasize relevance and real world applicability.

He has recently studied how RFID technology can revolutionize the management of supply chains. He has investigated the value of RFID applications in retail environments, in logistics, and in manufacturing and assembly operations. He has also studied how Supply Flexibility in retail supply chains affects a company's financial performance and market capitalization.

He is an active consultant to industry and is involved in numerous executive education programs both at Stanford and around the world. He was the founding director of a two-day executive program on Integrated Supply Chain Management held semi-annually in Palo Alto, California from 1994 to 2003. His consulting clients represent the following industries: general manufacturing, electronics, computers, consumer products, food & beverage, transportation, healthcare, and high technology. He is also a co-founder of Supply Chain Online, which provides web-based corporate supply chain management training. He serves on the technical advisory boards of several Silicon Valley startups. He has also served as an Expert Witness for litigation involving operations management

In 1994 he was elected President of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA). He has also served on the Board of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) and on several National Science Foundation Advisory Panels and Committees. He is a Fellow of INFORMS, a Distinguished Fellow of the Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Society, and a Fellow of the Production & Operations Management Society. He has also won several teaching awards, including the Eugene Grant Teaching Award in Stanford's School of Engineering in 1998.

He earned a BA in Economics from Yale and a PhD from MIT's Sloan School of Management.