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Jameson to receive Association for Computational Mechanics John von Neumann Medal

Professor honored for advances in the study of compressible flow over aircraft and the optimal design of air foils.

Jameson to receive Association for Computational Mechanics John von Neumann Medal

May 6, 2015

Antony Jameson, professor of aeronautics and astronautics, will receive the U.S. Association for Computational Mechanics (USACM) John von Neumann Medal for 2015 "for pioneering contributions to computational fluid dynamics, particular to advances in the study of compressible flow over aircraft and the optimal design of air foils."

The highest award given by USACM, the John von Neumann Medal honors individuals who have made outstanding, sustained contributions in the field of computational mechanics during substantial portions of their professional careers.

Jameson's research focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations with applications to subsonic, transonic and supersonic flow past complex configurations, as well as aerodynamic shape optimization. His software has been widely used by major aerospace companies, including Boeing and Airbus, for the aerodynamic design of both military and commercial aircraft, most recently by Gulfstream for the aerodynamic design of the G650, which has just won the 2014 Collier Trophy.

Jameson earned his PhD from the University of Cambridge and has received numerous awards and honors, including NASA’s Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, the Royal Aeronautical Society’s Gold Medal, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ Fluid Dynamics Award, ASME’s Spirit of St. Louis Medal, USACM’s Computational Fluid Mechanics Award and the Elmer Sperry Award from six engineering societies for advancing the art of transportation. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of London, the Royal Aeronautical Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering.

The award will be presented in July during the 13th U.S. National Congress on Computational Mechanics in San Diego, Calif.